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Corks set to pop to celebrate century of commerce

11 October 2006

Corks set to pop to celebrate century of commerce at UC

University of Canterbury commerce alumni will be raising their glasses next week to toast a century of achievement when celebrations commence to mark the Commerce Centenary.

The College of Business and Economics is celebrating the centennial year of its major undergraduate programme, the Bachelor of Commerce (BCom), one of the oldest undergraduate degrees in business and economics in the English-speaking world.

The Centenary festivities begin with a cocktail evening on the Friday of Labour weekend (20 October) at the Christchurch Art Gallery. Around 300 alumni, current and former staff and invited dignitaries are expected at the function where BCom graduate and National Party MP John Key will be guest speaker.

Saturday’s events include tours of both the old and new campuses, golf at Clearwater Resort, family entertainment, roll calls for photos and a dinner for both alumni and staff.

There will also be a number of special events on the programme to ensure the centennial celebrations will be remembered for some years to come. Distinguished UC alumna Pansy Wong MP will be involved in a tree-planting ceremony on Saturday and a centenary time capsule will be sealed up ready to be housed in a display case in the College foyer until it is opened in 50 years time.

The time capsule will contain a special edition Commerce Chronicles, featuring all commerce news coverage from the University’s publication Chronicle and College News dating back to 1963, the old and new New Zealand “small change” coins, photographs, a College handbook, a newspaper of the day and a parchment scroll which all reunion attendees will be invited to sign.

College of Business and Economics Pro-Vice-Chancellor Professor Nigel Healey says the celebrations are a testament to the vision of James Hight, the University’s first professor of history and economics, who founded the Faculty of Commerce in 1906.

“Over the last 100 years, the Faculty has guided the development of our ‘flagship’ Bachelor of Commerce, providing generations of undergraduate students with a rigorous education in business and economics and preparing them for successful careers in business, government and the professions.

“Professor Hight and his contemporaries showed considerable foresight, shrewdness and courage in establishing the Faculty of Commerce in 1906. Our role is to live up to their inspiring example and ensure that, as the 21st century unfolds, future alumni will continue to feel the same pride we take today in our first century of achievement.”

ENDS

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