Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Media workers homicides increase due to Iraq wa

Wednesday 16 July 2008

Increase in homicides of media workers due to Iraq war

In many countries, media workers such as journalists, camera/sound operators and translators are being killed due to their jobs, according to just published research by the University of Otago, Wellington.

The study in the international journal ‘Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health’, examined five authoritative data bases to find the number and risk factors for all media worker homicides worldwide during 2002-2006.

The researchers found at least 370 media workers who were killed intentionally, with the highest levels in Iraq, Philippines, Colombia and Russia. There were 214 additional deaths that did not meet the researchers’ strict definition of homicide, although there was evidence that a significant proportion of these were ‘accidents’ or ‘cover-ups’.

Only a small proportion of those killed were foreigners, as 89% of the media workers were local citizens. The confirmed homicides of Iraqi media workers increased from zero in 2002 to over 40 in 2006. There was at least one homicide in 54 countries.

“We found a significant increase in homicides of media workers, with annual homicides doubling from 41 in 2002, to 104 in 2006”, says Dr George Thomson from the Department of Public Health. “They were nearly all nationals of the country they worked in, and less than 25% of the homicides resulted in an arrest or a prosecution.”

The researchers found that the greatest risk to media workers is in countries where Governments are unable to control armed groups. Other risks include levels of political terror and corruption.

“Media workers are under great risk in these countries because a free media is the direct opponent of groups or governments that profit from corruption, that maintain power by force and are not seen as legitimate by the public,” says Dr Thomson.

The researchers argue that the killing of media workers is an important public health issue, because of the media’s role as a determinant of societal well-being. If there is not a free flow of information, the health of a society is likely to be compromised.

The researchers suggest that the organisations that investigate and publicise media worker deaths provide an essential service for the international common good. The organisations reviewed for this study were: the Committee to Protect Journalists, Reporters Without Borders, UNESCO, the International News Safety Institute and the International Press Institute.

This study was partly funded by the Wellington Medical Research Foundation.

ENDS

www.uow.otago.ac.nz

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news