Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Hungarian President Lecturing On Sustainability

Media release 22 September 2009

Hungarian President Lecturing On Sustainability

The President of Hungary is visiting The University of Auckland to give a public lecture on environmental responsibility this coming Friday 25 September (11.15am-12noon, OGGB4, Level O, Owen G Glenn Building, 12 Grafton Road).

His Excellency Mr László Sólyom will speak about “Possible parallels: Profound changes facilitating democracy and sustainable ecology” (details below). His lecture will include an open forum lasting ten minutes.

Mr Sólyom is a noted lawyer with a passion for ecopolitics and environmental protection. He seeks to bring a critical ecological approach to issues of globalisation, and has inaugurated a “Network of Green Presidents”.

He will arrive on campus at 10.45am for a formal welcome and gift presentation at the Council Room, The ClockTower, 22 Princes Street. Following his lecture he will view exhibitions on the University’s environmental research and be treated to a luncheon attended by environmental researchers. He leaves the Fale Pasifika, 20 Wynyard Street for his next engagement at 2pm.

The Vice-Chancellor, Professor Stuart McCutcheon, says the University is honoured to be hosting the Hungarian President. “Our reputation for environmental research mirrors the President's ‘green’ interests and we are looking forward to a useful exchange of views.”

The President arrives in New Zealand on 24 September on a four-day visit focusing on education, scientific and cultural links.

NOTE TO EDITORS: The President’s lecture will be in English; the question and answer session will be translated. The text of his lecture is expected to be available beforehand and can be sent to you on request. Journalists are welcome to attend the lecture. Please arrive by 10.45am and produce ID with photo.

DETAILS OF LECTURE It is by now a global commonplace that humans from all walks of life on this planet should exist in a sustainable manner, and the sooner the better. In the next ten years the affluent regions of the world need to achieve radical reductions in their emissions and material output. Rapidly approaching deadlines that have been internationally agreed upon indicate the urgency of the multi-faceted task ahead. Whole populations of large geopolitical regions would make a leap over the deep end by finally embarking on this "experiment on an historical scale”. But can countries, in essence very complex systems, be radically changed at all in a short space of time? And if yes, what may be the price to pay in unrest and upheavals? Even if successful in the end, can rapid socio-economic transitions remain peaceful? To assist answering these questions, the other side of the Globe may offer some of its experiences to share.



It is a well-known fact that twenty years ago Hungary, along with the whole region of Central and Eastern Europe did embark on a huge "social experiment”: the transition to democracy and market economy. This transformation, undertaken for the sake of freedom, dignity and prosperity, has been of a scale comparable to the transformation required today for the sake of sustainability. There can be made a systems-level analogy between the two: the rapid and complete dismantling of the whole existing political, social and economic system, and the simultaneous re-building of something hoped to be more viable, more sustainable.



It is rare if not unparalleled to undertake changes affecting the way of life of entire societies at such a speed, to such a geographic extent and depth, while more or less maintaining peace, order, and the rule of law. But the experiment in Central and Eastern Europe started twenty years ago offers parallels and transferable experiences which may be relevant for the planning, launching and leading of a peaceful global transition to social and environmental sustainability.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: The Typewriter Factory

I finished reading Don’t Dream It’s Over not long after it came out last August. I even started writing a review, which took something of an ‘I’m sorry people, but it’s already over’ approach. I’ve been pretty negative about journalism as it’s practiced in the mainstream (or MSM, or corporate media or liberal media or whatever terminology you prefer) for quite some time (see for example Stop the Press), and I believe the current capitalist media model is destructive and can’t be reformed. More>>

Sheep Update: Solo World Shearing Record Broken In Southland

Southland shearer Leon Samuels today set a new World solo eight-hours strongwool ewe-shearing after a tally of 605 in a wool shed north of Gore. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Dick Frizzell At The Solander Gallery

One of the most influential and celebrated contemporary Pop artists working in New Zealand, Dick Frizzell is mostly known for his appropriation of kitsch Kiwiana icons, which he often incorporates into cartoon-like paintings and lithographs. Not content with adhering to one particular style, he likes to adopt consciously unfashionable styles of painting, in a manner reminiscent of Roy Lichtenstein. More>>

Old Music: Pop Icon Adam Ant Announces NZ Tour

Following his recent sold out North American and UK tours, Adam Ant is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the release of his landmark KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER album with a newly-remastered reissue (Sony Legacy) and Australasian tour. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Looking Back

Writing a memoir that appeals to a broad readership is a difficult undertaking. As an experienced communicator, Lloyd Geering keeps the reader’s interest alive through ten chapters (or portholes) giving views of different aspects of his life in 20th-century New Zealand. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Purple (and Violet) Prose

This is the second recent conjoint publication by Reeve and Stapp; all to do with esoteric, arcane and obscure vocabulary – sesquipedalian, anyone – and so much more besides. Before I write further, I must stress that the book is an equal partnership between words and images and that one cannot thrive without the other. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news