Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

School dropout now bestselling education author

START

A Christchurch school dropout will present a workshop at ULearn after becoming an international bestselling educational author.

Well known to many for his radio and broadcasting work Gordon Dryden will speak to delegates at ULearn about the The seven keys to unlock the future of learning from his latest book Unlimited.

ULearn09 is an educational conference focusing on innovative teaching and learning for the 21st century organised by CORE Education that attracts about 2000 delegates and features 400 national and international speakers.

CORE Education’s director of development Nick Billowes said Gordon Dryden was an engaging speaker and his range of insights across the spectrum of innovative education had won him much acclaim.

“He is a proud and unashamed advocate for the quality educational opportunities within New Zealand.

“We are lucky to have such a high calibre of speakers in New Zealand to be able to tap into. Gordon will be well worth listening to along with the many talented speakers we have on the programme,” Mr Billowes said.

Dryden is so passionate about his latest book he has co-authored with American doctor of education Jeanette Vos that he is giving away a copy to everyone attending the conference.

The book Unlimited and subtitled The new learning revolution and the seven keys to unlock it is named after a Christchurch school of the same name.

Students at the Unlimited high school, and its associated Discovery One primary school, use all of Christchurch as their classroom — as they follow personalised learning pathways, Dryden said.



“This is a similar philosophy to my own that everyone has a different potential to be great at something — and it is up to schools to help find that something and develop it, using the entire world as their classroom, throughout life,” he said.

Dryden, who completed his primary schooling at Waltham, Phillipstown and New Brighton schools in the 1940s, dropped out of Christchurch West High School (now Hagley High) after only one year.

“I really wanted to be a journalist so I wanted to learn shorthand and typing but back then boys weren’t allowed to do it, so I left,” he said.

However, after dropping out of school he did not give up and the world became his classroom. He went on to become a well known broadcast journalist and bestselling educational author. In 1993 he met Dr Vos at an educational conference.

When they both realised they were working on similar things a collaboration was started -- Dryden was editing 150 hours of professional videotape, on that subject, down to six one-hour New Zealand television documentaries; and Vos had just completed a seven-year research program on the same subject for her doctorate.

Their first work together produced the book Learning Revolution which went on to sell 10 million copies in China within seven months and has now been translated into twenty different languages.

Dryden has not long returned from a series of presentations and television interviews in Mexico, where Unlimited will shortly be published in Spanish.

While overseas he also made a pitch to the United Nations to use New Zealand schools as a role model for other countries to help bridge the gap between rich and poor.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 


Resene Eighth Annual Architecture & Design Film Festival

This year’s line-up will showcase the most acclaimed and current films in architecture and design, including documentaries on this century’s finest architects, super stars in the design field and movements for environmental change. More>>

Filthy Rich Scores American Remake

New Zealand drama Filthy Rich has been green-lit for a US remake by Fox network starring Sex and the City’s Kim Cattrall… A pilot episode shot in New Orleans earlier this year also saw Kim Cattrall in the starring role, based on the character played by Miriama Smith in NZ. More>>

Ockhams: ‘Urgently Relevant’ Novel Wins NZ’s Richest Literary Award

Dame Fiona Kidman has won this year’s $53,000 Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize at the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards for her novel, This Mortal Boy, a work described by the judges as ‘moving, memorable, authentic and urgently relevant to our times.’ More>>

ALSO:


Comedy Festival: The Comedy Festival Is On

Binge on almost a full month of comedic delights, as the NZ International Comedy Festival runs from 2-26/5 in Auckland and Wellington. More>>

ALSO:


Lucy Gardner Photo Essay: You Are Us - Aroha Nui Concert Christchurch

The New Zealand Music Industry presented remarkable unifying support for those affected by the terrorist attacks at two Christchurch mosques. More>>

Prof Andrew Geddis: Otago Academic Receives Critic And Conscience Award

This award was established to encourage academic staff at New Zealand universities to act as ‘critic and conscience of society’—as required under the Education Act—by providing the public with independent, expert commentary on issues affecting the New Zealand community and future generations. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland