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Victoria celebrates its newest graduates

Victoria celebrates its newest graduates

Almost 1000 students will celebrate successfully completing their studies during next week’s graduation procession and ceremonies.

The traditional street parade of staff and graduands will depart from the Government Buildings Historic Reserve on Wednesday at noon, parading along Lambton Quay and Willis and Mercer Streets to finish in Civic Square, where they will be welcomed by Deputy Mayor Ian McKinnon.

The first of three ceremonies will commence at the Michael Fowler Centre on Tuesday at 6pm for students graduating from the Faculties of Architecture & Design, Education, Science and Toihuarewa.

Victoria University Vice-Chancellor Professor Pat Walsh says that graduation is a satisfying way to round off the year.

“It is a highlight for me to be able to congratulate our students on their hard work and achievements for the year,” says Professor Walsh.

“Victoria is the start of many exciting and rewarding careers both nationally and internationally, and I look forward to following our new graduates’ successes.”

Forty-two PhDs will be granted, along with approximately 950 degrees, diplomas and certificates.

Honorary Doctorates will be granted to: Chairman of the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research, Graham Malaghan; New Zealand colonial history scholar, Emeritus Professor Alan Ward; and international civil servant, Richard Carey.

Higher Doctorates will be granted to Sir Edmund Thomas and David McGee. Both will be admitted to the degree of Doctor of Laws.

Interesting graduation stories include:

Mina Moayed
Iran-born Mina is of the Baha’i faith. She escaped from Iran as a teenager 25 years ago, because she was banned from studying at university in Iran due to her religious beliefs. Mina will be graduating with an MBA, on Wednesday 16 December at 6pm.

Wellington Lions graduating – Victor Vito and Arden David-Perrot
Two Pacific Island members of the Wellington Lions rugby team will be graduating in Wednesday’s 1.30pm ceremony, following the graduation parade. Arden David-Perrot will graduate with a BA in Education and Pacific Studies, and Victor Vito will graduate with a BA in Classics.

Mother and daughter – Philippa and Rachel Burns
Philippa and Rachel will be graduating with Bachelor of Arts degrees at the same ceremony on 16 December at 1.30pm. Philippa (mother) will be wearing the family graduation gown, first worn 100 years ago in 1909 at Canterbury College by her paternal grandmother Henrietta Dyer. The gown has been worn by four generations of the family so far.

Visha Balakrishnan
Visha is from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. She completed her PhD in Education in two and a half years, while adjusting and adapting to life in New Zealand and caring for her two boys aged eight and 12. Her research focuses on using real-life dilemmas to teach moral education in secondary schools. She was one of the Olympic torch bearers in 2008, and says that when she was running with the torch, it gave her the feeling that she would make it in her PhD journey too and “all she had to do is work hard and stay focused”.

During her stay in New Zealand, Visha has done some tutoring in the university and has volunteered to work with refugees and migrants on English Language skills who are settling in New Zealand, to help them cope with the language and the many daily life challenges that they face.


Ceremony details

Tuesday 15 December: Michael Fowler Centre
Ceremony 1: 6pm Faculties of Architecture and Design, Education, Science and Toihuarewa
Honorary Doctorate: Graham Malaghan

Wednesday 16 December: Michael Fowler Centre
Noon graduate parade

Ceremony 2: 1.30pm Faculties of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Law, and New Zealand School of Music
Honorary Doctorate: Alan Ward
Higher Doctorate: David McGee, Edmund Thomas

Ceremony 3: 6.00pm Faculty of Commerce and Administration
Honorary Doctorate: Richard Carey

If the graduation parade is cancelled due to wet weather, notification will be given on
Newstalk ZB from 11am on the morning of the parade.

ENDS

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