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MAINZ Christchurch Turns to Technology to Continue Teaching

MAINZ Christchurch Campus Turns to Modern Technology to Continue Teaching

Tai Poutini Polytechnic’s Music and Audio Institute of New Zealand (MAINZ) has resumed classes in Christchurch using a high tech approach to teach students.

Audio Engineering and Music Production students took part in class yesterday from the safety of their own homes. Audio tutor Matt Scott delivered a sound theory class online to 21 of his certificate students, 70 per cent of the class.

Two students unable to get internet access will be sent copies of the lessons and for those that missed out or would like to review it, the session was recorded and is available through the MAINZ Moodle (e-campus) site.

MAINZ Dean Harry Lyon says as long as students have access to the internet they can resume their normal timetable for theory classes.

“It's a fantastic achievement to be able to move so swiftly and use modern technology to continue teaching in extraordinary and difficult circumstances,” he says.

“One advantage is MAINZ is already very computer based so all the staff are very computer savvy and have been able to adapt to this new way of teaching very quickly,” he says.

Certificate student Jay McKenzie says it was really cool to get back to class.

“No-one else I know is back studying yet. It was comforting being in your own home and because there was a chat box it was just like we were in a classroom,” he says.

Ninety staff and students escaped unhurt from MAINZ’s two Christchurch campuses on February the 22nd.

Staff believe the main High Street campus is still structurally sound but its location near the Grand Chancellor Hotel means it is in the “no go zone”. The Armagh Street campus, commonly known as the Media Club Building, has been badly damaged.

“Plans are advancing to secure new teaching space and hopefully regular classes will be back on track soon. Using the computer for theory class delivery is a great interim measure,” says Mr Lyon.

The High Street and Armagh Street campuses housed recording studios, rehearsal rooms, an auditorium, MIDI suites, music instruments and a wide range of live sound equipment.

END

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