Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search


Shortage of trained hospitality staff

Media release – 14 April 2011

Shortage of trained hospitality staff

The hospitality industry is crying out for trained staff with figures showing 70 per cent of people working in the industry have only a school qualification or less.

A report by the Hospitality Standards Institute has found the hospitality workforce tends to be lower qualified, younger and more ethnically diverse than the average workforce.

The news comes at a time when there is a shortage of trained supervisors in the industry says Roderick Turner, Head of Department Services at Tai Poutini Polytechnic.

“So often hospitality is seen as a fill-in job, when in reality tourism, of which hospitality is a huge part, is the biggest industry on the West Coast,” he says.

“New Zealanders and international visitors have increased expectations of the level of service they receive when dining out. Cafes, restaurants and hotels are always on the look out for well-qualified supervisory level staff to oversee the delivery of this service.”

Hospitality Standards Institute Chief Executive Steve Hanrahan says the report established staff training makes a significant difference to the bottom line of hospitality outlets.

“The report shows training staff results in less staff turnover, more repeat business and more efficient operations,” he says.

“While service is generally good, it can be a bit of a lottery in New Zealand. It’s the exception rather than the rule to get outstanding service”.

Last year Anne Paterson completed a Hospitality Supervision certificate at Tai Poutini Polytechnic. She studied while working at the Recreation Hotel.

“I got promoted to restaurant supervisor at Buccleugh’s On High Restaurant after doing the course which was great,” she says.

“I learnt a lot about the management side of hospitality and its always good on the CV.”

Linda Connors, owner of the Recreation Hotel says Anne brought a lot of new skills to the restaurant during her time at the Polytech.

“The restaurant has got a really good reputation for service and much of that is because of staff who have done hospitality courses,” she says.

It is particularly hard to get trained staff at the moment. I am always going to employ someone who has done a course over someone who hasn’t”.

The Certificate in Hospitality Supervision is aimed at hospitality workers wishing to up-skill and move into management positions.

“The overriding principle in the programme is to promote professionalism and quality customer service skills to all students,” says Mr Turner.

The Hospitality and Tourism programme – designed for Food and Beverage and Tourism service professionals starts Monday May 2.

Hopitality Supervision starts Wednesday May 18


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Leonardo da Vinci - The Graphic Work

The breadth of da Vinci’s work is incredible: from animals to weaponry, architecture to fabric, maps to botany. The works have been divided into themes such as Proportion Drawings, Anatomical Drawings and Drawings of Maps and Plans. Each section begins with a short essay. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: James Hector: Explorer, Scientist, Leader

Publication of this comprehensive 274-page account of the life and work of James Hector by the Geoscience Society of New Zealand marks the 150th anniversary of James Hector’s appointment as New Zealand’s first government scientist. More>>

On Shoestrings And Phones: Rossellini And Contemporary Film

Howard Davis: Roberto Rossellini's Neo-Realist Rome, Open City provides some fascinating technical parallels to Tangerine, an equally revolutionary Independent movie made exactly seventy years later. More>>

Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news