Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


New Zealand School for Social Entrepreneurs Opens

New Zealand School for Social Entrepreneurs Opens


The New Zealand School for Social Entrepreneurs is officially launched in South Auckland today. (Wednesday March 21)

Twelve entrepreneurs involved in an array of social ventures aimed to radically improve lives in their communities have been selected for the first intake of the new action leaning school.

Social entrepreneurs are change agents for communities. They see unmet social needs and develop programmes to meet those needs.

The ventures include turning a community medicinal herb garden into a sustainable business that provides affordable medicines created from local plants; creating a Marae database; connecting families and communities through creative projects; turning disused and sometimes dangerous reserve land into community centres and improving educational and long-term outcomes for at-risk children and youth.

Some of the enterprises are in the start up phase, others have been up and running for more than a decade.

The Executive Director of the Social Entrepreneurs School, Faye Langdon, says despite the diversity of the projects there are some characteristics the students share.

“A social entrepreneur is an individual who shows all the classic traits of entrepreneurship - the drive, passion and resilience," she says. "And the 'social' side is that they are committed to bringing about social change, which often comes from their direct experience."

The participants’ backgrounds, ethnicity and experiences are also diverse.

Student and former New Zealand Army Gunnery Sergeant Thomas de Thierry says the students are a group of dynamic and diverse individuals.

“We all have a passion and drive to find better ways of developing projects within our own communities, eventually becoming sustainable and profitable in so many ways.”

The New Zealand School for Social Entrepreneurs is modelled on similar schools in the United Kingdom and Australia. In the UK 85% of student enterprises are still operating after seven years and each student creates an average three jobs and seven volunteering positions. The first 64 Australian fellows have already collected $4 million in funding, created 79 jobs and 360 volunteering positions.


Experienced entrepreneurs and business leaders will provide mentoring and networks during the nine month course which will also teach skills in areas ranging from governance and marketing to funding and business planning.

The Social Entrepreneurs School has been set up by the New Zealand Centre for Social Innovation in partnership and with support from: CMDHB, Gen-i , Kordia Group, Ruapotaka Marae, Te Puni Kokiri, Te Hana Te O Marama, The Lotteries Commission and Westpac.

The Chair of the Centre for Social Innovation, Dr Monique Faleafa says social entrepreneurs act as change agents for communities and society, developing ideas and new approaches, creating and implementing solutions to social problems that change society for the better.

“All communities, particularly those experiencing significant disadvantage need to have the capacity to find and grow their own solutions to their own social and economic challenges.”

Pauline Kingi Regional Director Te Puni Kōkiri, notes herstaff in the Tāmaki Makaurau regional office have been working hard to support early-stage Māori social entrepreneurs to build sustainable new social enterprises, social businesses and non-profit ventures.

“This school provides a unique opportunity for four Māori social entrepreneurs in the inaugural cohort of 12 students, with these students coming from Te Hana Te O Marama and Ruapotaka Marae.

“History has proven social change is people powered. The school is about supporting these individuals with access to experts, coaching, tutorials, shared study sessions with like minded entrepreneurs as well as developing day to day operating skills so that they can create a robust and enduring contribution.”
Ends
TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE PROGRAMME APPLICANTS MUST:
• Have an idea/project that has a community or environmental benefit
• Demonstrate passion, drive and commitment to their idea/project
• Have ownership of their idea/project and autonomy of decision-making
• Be able to commit to the 9-month programme 1 day per week
• Contribute $1500 as a school fee over and above awarded scholarship
www.nzcsi.org

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Activism: Greenpeace Intercepts World’s Biggest Seismic Oil Ship

Greenpeace crew have made contact with the world’s biggest seismic oil ship after travelling 50 nautical miles on two rigid-hulled inflatables off the coast of Wairarapa... Greenpeace radioed the master of the Amazon Warrior to deliver an open letter of protest signed by over 60,000 New Zealanders. More>>

ALSO:

Carrie Fisher: Hollywood In-Breeding & The Velocity Of Being - Binoy Kampmark

There was always going to be a good deal of thick drama around Carrie Fisher, by her own confession, a product of Hollywood in-breeding. Her parents, Debbie Reynolds and the crooner Eddie Fisher, provided ample material for the gossip columns in a marriage breakup after Eddie sped away with Elizabeth Taylor. More>>

  • Image: Tracey Nearmy / EPA
  • Gordon Campbell: On The Best Albums Of 2016

    OK, I’m not even going to try and rationalise this surrender to a ‘best of’ listicle. Still…maybe there is an argument for making some semblance of narrative order out of a year that brought us Trump, Brexit and the deaths of Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen and Alan Vega, who I missed just as much as the Big Three. So without further ado….oh, but first a word from the sponsor More>>

    Emojis: World’s First Māori Emoji App Launched

    It’s here - the world’s first Māori emoji app Emotiki has landed just in time for summer roadtrips and santa stockings, with 200 Māori and Kiwi cultural icons for people to share their kiwiana moments with each other and the world. More>>

    ALSO:

    Howard Davis: Album Of The Year - Van Morrison's 'Keep Me Singing'

    2016 was a grand year for Van The Man - The Belfast Cowboy turned 71, received a knighthood, and reissued an expanded set of soul-fired live recordings from 1973 ('It's Too Late to Stop Now'). In the game for 53 years now, Morrison's albums consistently open new windows into the heart and soul of one of the most enigmatic figures in modern music. More>>

    Review: The NZSO Performs Handel's Messiah

    Max Rashbrooke: Saturday night's performance took the piece back to something like the way it would have originally been performed when premiered in 1742, with an orchestra of 20-30 players and only a few more singers. More>>

    Culture: Rare Hundertwasser Conservation Posters Found After 40 Years

    When Jan and Arnold Heine put a roll of conservation posters into storage in 1974 they had no idea that 42 years later they would be collectors items. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Education
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news