Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Debate About Childhood Trauma And Schizophrenia Settled

University of Auckland. Media Release. 26.4.2012

Debate About Childhood Trauma And Schizophrenia Settled By Review Of 46 Studies

Researchers at the Universities of Liverpool. Maastricht (Netherlands) and Auckland have found that children who have experienced childhood trauma are three times more likely to develop schizophrenia in later life.

The findings, based on analysing 46 studies involving 80,000 subjects, shed new light on the debate about the importance of genetic and environmental triggers of psychotic disorders. For decades research has focused on the biological factors behind conditions such as schizophrenia, but there is now conclusive evidence that these conditions cannot be fully understood without looking at the patients’ life experiences.

This is the first ‘meta-analysis’ to analyse 30 years of studies on the association between childhood trauma and the psychosis. The researchers looked at more than 27,000 research papers to extract data from three types of studies; those addressing the progress of children known to have experienced adversity; studies of randomly selected members of the population; and research on psychotic patients who were asked about their early childhood. The analysis covered physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, neglect, bullying, and parental death.

Across all three types of studies the results led to similar conclusions. Children who had experienced any type of trauma before the age of 16 were approximately three times more likely to become psychotic in adulthood compared to those selected randomly from the population. There was also a relationship between the level of trauma and the likelihood of psychosis later life. Those that were severely traumatised as children were at a greater risk, in some cases up to 50 times increased risk, than those who experienced trauma to a lesser extent. The paper concludes that “childhood adversity is strongly associated with increased risk for psychosis”.

Professor Richard Bentall, from the University of Liverpool:

“Now that we know environment is a major factor in psychosis and that there are direct links between specific experiences and symptoms of the condition, it is even more vital that psychiatric services routinely question patients about their life experience. Surprisingly, some psychiatric teams do not address these issues and only focus on treating a patient with medication.”

Professor John Read, from the University of Auckland’s Psychology Department:
“This remains a controversial topic, so to have a sophisticated meta-analysis of all the relevant research find that childhood adversities definitely are causal factors for psychosis, which some psychiatrists still think is a biological illness, is very important”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Francis Cook: Gallipoli: The Scale Of Our War – First Look

Te Papa today allowed media access to their new exhibition Gallipoli: The Scale of Our War . The exhibition was curated with help from Weta Workshop to deliver an immersive, realistic and even disorienting experience. More>>

ALSO:

Bats Theatre: Letters From The Front Brings ANZAC Letters Alive

Inspired by centenary commemorations, improv troupe Best on Tap is producing a show based on real-life letters sent to and from New Zealand soldiers in the First World War. More>>

ALSO:

Publishing: Unity Books On Plan To Close Te Papa Press

Unity Books is alarmed that Te Papa is proposing to suspend publishing by Te Papa Press for 4 or 5 years. Te Papa Press has proven time and time again that it has both award and bestseller capability and fulfils its kaupapa. More>>

ALSO:

Cinema: ‘The Desk’ Featuring Paul Henry To Have NZ Debut

The Documentary Edge Festival is thrilled to announce The Desk as a late entry to its 2015 Programme. The film, featuring local broadcaster Paul Henry, will have its international premiere on May 21 at 10pm at Q Theatre (book now at qtheatre.co.nz) with limited screenings also on offer in Wellington and Auckland. More>>

ALSO:

Art: Considering Feminisms In Aotearoa New Zealand: Two Projects

Feminism is something that has changed our lives. Recently, the activist Marilyn Waring reviewed the impact of feminism in Aotearoa New Zealand and reminded us that just 40 years ago banks wouldn’t lend women money without the guarantee of a man, ... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news