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NorthTec opens new Creative Centre – Toi Te Pito

Media release: NorthTec opens new Creative Centre – Toi Te Pito (31/10/2012)

NorthTec, Northland’s largest tertiary institution, officially opened its new Creative Centre – Toi Te Pito on Friday 26 October.

The new and refurbished state-of-the-art facility, located at NorthTec’s Raumanga Campus, is home to the Whangarei based programmes in Arts, Māori Arts, Media Arts, Fashion, Beauty Therapy and Hairdressing.

Whangarei MP, Hon. Phil Heatley, officially opened the facility on short notice due to Hon. Steven Joyce, Minister of Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment, being unwell and unable to attend. He was proud to be able to take his place, and alluded to the fact that things have changed considerably over the years with NorthTec now being rated in the top 10 ITPs in the country.

Vern Dark, NorthTec Council Chair, spoke on the fact that Creative Industries is a thriving sector in Northland and is helping to grow the local economy. He also touched on the fact that NorthTec needs to raise its capability for Māori education, as approximately 46% of NorthTec’s SAC funded students were Māori in 2011. The new facilities have a large area dedicated to Māori Arts in addition to excellent facilities in the other areas it plays host to.

Lindsay Marks, Programme Leader for Applied Arts, believes that Toi Te Pito will help to expand the programme possibilities, increase the number of students that can be catered for, and help the various programme areas to work even closer with industry.

In addition to the opening formalities, NorthTec recognised the renowned Northland Sculptor, Chris Booth, with their ‘Honorary Fellow Award’ for outstanding and distinguished contribution to society. Mr Booth was humbled by the award, and bestowed his

empowerment to Toi Te Pito and the arts students of Northland. Mr Booth is so thrilled with the new centre, and the work that NorthTec is doing with their students, that he is freeing up some of his time to speak to current arts students at a special lecture on 13 November.

The afternoon saw guided tours through the facility, the “Show Off” Fashion show, put on by Fashion, Hair and Beauty Therapy students, live music and a sausage sizzle. The day was perfect, and all those in attendance left the celebration with a feeling of encouragement and pride.


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