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Future environmental science leaders

1 November 2012
MEDIA RELEASE
Future environmental science leaders at Environment Canterbury

Estelle Arundell, a pupil at Craighead Diocesan School in Timaru, has won Environment Canterbury’s Wrybill Trophy for 2012.

The award was made today at Environment Canterbury’s council meeting. Chair of Commissioners Dame Margaret Bazley presented Estelle with the trophy after presentations made by the students to the Environment Canterbury commissioners and staff.

The Wrybill Trophy is the supreme award given to the most outstanding Year 7-13 student(s) and their school in the Resource Management section of the Canterbury schools Science and Technology fairs. The award is judged by Lincoln University Professor Jon Hickford as the best of the best of the two fairs, held each year in Christchurch and Timaru. The fairs and the award encourage emerging scientists to think about and investigate environmental issues relevant to our region.

The trophy itself was created by sculptor Jim Instone of Christchurch, using recycled metals, the wrybill plover representing the uniqueness of the Canterbury environment.

Estelle’s project, ‘Hand printing for the future’, looked at promoting the idea of a “carbon handprint” alongside the well-known idea of a carbon footprint within her community, the difference being that a carbon footprint is the mark you leave on the planet, whereas a carbon handprint is a way to show others what you are going to do about it.

Judging the awards, Dr Hickford was impressed at the high quality of the work on display. “There is a lot of emphasis on sustainability in schools, and if more children are educated to think about sustainability then as a community we are on the right foot. If it’s done well, then sound environmental practice has sound economic benefits as well,” he said.

Dame Margaret congratulated all the students for their hard work and dedication. “Science and research underpin much of what we do at Environment Canterbury, and to see this level of ability and commitment from upcoming environmental scientists is very encouraging for the region’s future,” she said.

The two runners-up, also presenting to the Council, were:

Emma Jansen – Hinds School
Emma’s project, ‘Be Safe, Be Seen’, compared the visibility of fluoro safety jackets of various colours in different weather conditions.

Lorna Pairman – Cashmere Primary
Plastic bags are a real nuisance & have been banned in several countries. Lorna’s project is an ongoing investigation into how long it actually takes for so-called biodegradable plastic bags to break down.


ENDS

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