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The Rhodes Scholarships for New Zealand

The Rhodes Scholarships for New Zealand

The Rhodes Scholarships are postgraduate awards supporting outstanding all-round students at the University of Oxford, and providing transformative opportunities for exceptional individuals. The Rhodes Scholarships were established in 1903 under the will of Cecil Rhodes. 221 Rhodes Scholars in total have come from New Zealand, the first arriving in Oxford in 1904. Each year three new Scholarships are awarded. Eminent Rhodes Scholars from New Zealand include:

Hon Justice Christine French, Judge of the New Zealand Court of Appeal
Dr John Hood, former Vice-Chancellor at the University of Oxford
Dr David Kirk, former captain of the All Blacks
Dr Jack Lovelock, 1936 Olympic gold medallist, 1500m
Baron Arthur Porritt, served as the 11th Governor-General of New Zealand
Professor Sir David Skegg, President of the Royal Society of New Zealand
Professor Ngaire Woods, Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford

The Rhodes is the oldest and perhaps the most prestigious international graduate scholarship program in the world. A class of 83 Scholars is selected each year from Australia, Bermuda, Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Jamaica and Commonwealth Caribbean, Kenya, New Zealand, Pakistan, Southern Africa (including South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, and Swaziland), United States, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

Rhodes's vision in founding the Scholarship was to develop outstanding leaders who would be motivated to fight 'the world's fight', to 'esteem the performance of public duties as their highest aim', and to promote international understanding and peace.

The Rhodes Scholarship selection committees seek young women and men of outstanding intellect, character, leadership, and commitment to service. The Rhodes Scholarships support students who demonstrate strong propensity to emerge as 'leaders for the world’s future'.


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