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British Government directive creates opportunity for NZ

Thursday, November 29, 2012 (NZ Time)

British Government directive creates opportunity for New Zealand service

After-school care to be exported to England

Safe Kids In Daily Supervision, a New Zealand- developed after-school care service, is bound for Britain.

John Geers, a London-based investor, has purchased the master franchise rights to take Safe Kids In Daily Supervision to 17,000 primary schools in England.

He has been in Auckland all this week, finalising arrangements with sKids head office. Negotiations began in September this year.

He said the United Kingdom Government's "Extended Schools Agenda" requires all primary schools to have pre and after-school care services for children.
"This is in response to the growing trend of working Parents," said John Geers.

"Many of them face big challenges meeting both family and work commitments without effective support from their schools.
"sKids has developed and refined a very professional and caring service that will be welcomed in Britain," he said.

English primary schools teach children from age four to eleven.

"Many schools already have a service usually run by small ,local businesses," said John.

"There are some larger operations which serve regions of England, but none, large or small, have the level of professionalism which sKids offers.
"his is a whole new level of service.It is very thorough."

John recently left his role as director of a London company which advises on services and sponsored events for children. He said this background alerted him to the potential for sKids in his native country.

Dawn Engelbrecht, managing director of sKids, said John's interest is shared by people in other countries. The service has now been established in South Australia and negotiations continue in other parts of the World.


Caption: John Geers and sKids Managing Director, Dawn Engelbrechnt, at sKids New Zealand Headquarters in Auckland today.


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