Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Helping to revive Te Reo Māori


Helping to revive Te Reo Māori

A Massey PhD student says the future of Te Reo Māori rests with the younger generation and more needs to be done in schools to encourage children to use the language.

Palmerston North’s Hinurewa Poutu, who also teaches at Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Mana Tamariki, is passionate about reviving Māori language and hopes her research will provide insight into how Māori speaking teenagers are using the language.

“I’m looking at the frequency and the places where they [teenagers] choose to speak Māori in the hope that we can identify where we need to focus all of our energy to revive the Māori language,” Ms Poutu says. “It’s very clear that once kids hit their teens they prefer to speak English among themselves in social situations. Everything that is cool and trendy is in English like texting, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter and these have a huge influence.”

Ms Poutu (Ngāti Rangi, Te Āti Haunui a Pāpārangi, Ngāti Maniapoto) has based her thesis on the influences on Māori language use among teenagers who have attended Māori immersion early childhood or primary schools.

“There has been very little research in examination of the nature of where we use Māori particularly in the teenage years because the future of Māori rests on them.”

She says it’s possible that teenagers are resistant to speaking Māori because it is compulsory to speak the language in immersion schools.

“We have to decide is compulsion too much? Is it pushing them away from the language? What can we do to encourage a more positive attitude towards speaking Māori where they don’t feel like it’s a school rule and have to do it?”

Ms Poutu says Māori language does need to move towards being compulsory in mainstream New Zealand classrooms – even if it’s just learning how to correctly pronounce vowels in Māori.

“It is a national language so it belongs to all of us, Māori and non-Māori, so I believe giving the option to those who want to learn it, is important. Our schools play a role in making sure Te Reo isn’t lost. If we want Te Reo Māori to live, survive, and flourish we’ve got to make sure we put it in all environments – home, school, books and be able to discuss higher level academic theories in our language.”

She has worked at Te Kura Kāupapa o Mana Tamariki for eight years, and has also worked as a presenter, Māori language consultant, and associate producer for Māori media. She is also a member on the New Zealand Constitutional Advisory Panel.
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

TV3 Video: NZ Praised For Sportsmanship After Cricket World Cup Final Loss

New Zealand may have been outplayed in the Cricket World Cup final by Australia, but received praise worldwide for their graciousness in defeat. More>>

ALSO:

Earlier:

Werewolf: Finding Love In Hell

Will it really be 25 years in May since David Lynch’s Wild at Heart won big at Cannes, nabbing no less than the Palme d’Or? Amazing but true, and yet the film that was briefly Lynch’s most feted, now seems to be his most forgotten. More>>

ALSO:

Cricket: Dramatic Win Puts Black Caps In Finals

In Parliament: When Parliament resumed at 2pm the House passed a motion on a voice vote admiring the performance of the New Zealand cricket team in last night’s World Cup semi-final and wishing them well for the final on the weekend. More>>

ALSO:

Moon Shot/Kills Switch: The X Factor Judges Removed

MediaWorks has today decided that Natalia Kills and Willie Moon are no longer suitable to judge The X Factor and have removed them from the show. MediaWorks CEO, Mark Weldon, said that last night on The X Factor both Kills and Moon made comments that were completely unacceptable. More>>

ALSO:

Tessa Nichol: Up Up & Away In The Wairarapa

It’s an overcast morning in the Wairarapa but the mood on the ground in Carterton’s Carrington Park is anything but grey. More than 20 hot air balloons are getting ready to take off into the cloudy sky to mark the start of this year’s Wairarapa Balloon Festival. More>>

Golden Shears: Scotsman Wins Golden Shears Open Final

A Scottish shearer who settled in New Zealand to farm in Taranaki has become the first shearer from overseas to win the Golden Shears Open Shearing Championship. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news