Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search


Researcher on international environment panel

December 6, 2012

Researcher on international environment panel

Massey University Professor Ralph Sims has been appointed to a major international panel tasked with mitigating climate change in developing and emerging nations.

Professor Sims, of the School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, will sit on the science and technology advisory panel of the Global Environment Facility.

The facility unites 182 countries in partnership with international institutions, civil society organisations and the private sector to address global environmental issues while supporting national sustainable development initiatives. It is the largest public funder of projects to improve the global environment.

The United Nations Development Programme, led by former Prime Minister Helen Clark, is a Global Environment Facility implementing agency.

Last month she spoke about the need to act quickly to stop climate change. "Why isn’t the world doing more? We could, as a global community, make the transition to green and inclusive economies that tackle inequality, advance development and stop the ongoing assault on our ecosystem."

Professor Sims will now help decide what initiatives are funded by the facility. The projects, usually between $20-50 million each, relate to water, biodiversity, afforestation, climate change adaptation and climate change mitigation.

He says the position is an important one. “For climate change mitigation to work, some funding from the wealthy countries has to reach the least developed countries in assisting their sustainable development goals in an environmentally acceptable manner.”

He says New Zealand could also learn from some of the facility’s recommendations. “The GEF has just put out a report providing advice for developing nations on how to reduce their lighting energy demand. New Zealand could also benefit since we are one of the few OECD countries not to have a policy in place.”

Professor Sims has taught and researched sustainable energy topics at the University since 1971 and has achieved significant influence on climate change policy at an international level. He is a fellow of the Institute of Professional Engineers of New Zealand and the Institute of Agricultural Engineers in Britain, and is a Companion of the Royal Society of New Zealand. He has written for more than 300 publications, is a regular media commentator on energy issues and is passionate about sustainable energy.

He was lead author on reports for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, including one on renewable energy and another that won the panel’s 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, and currently is leading the transport chapter of the panel’s next assessment report.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


13/10: 40 Years Since The Māori Land March Arrived At Parliament

Traffic into Wellington came to a standstill as thousands of Māori and Pākehā streamed along the motorway into the capital on 13 October 1975, concluding the Māori land march to parliament. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Before The Quakes

Remembering Christchurch: Voices from decades past: The Christchurch I lived in for my first 23 years was where four-year-olds walked alone to kindergarten, crossing roads empty of all but a couple of cars per hour. My primary school, Ilam, was newly built on a grassy paddock surrounded by rural land... More>>

6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news