Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Treasury documents reveal scepticism of charter schools

Treasury documents reveal scepticism of charter schools


Treasury documents released today reveal that Treasury is sceptical of charter schools and questions their educational or economic merit.

The documents were released following an Official Information Act request by NZEI and are now publicly available on the Treasury website.

NZEI National Secretary Paul Goulter says that the Treasury documents largely support NZEI’s own opposition to charter schools including the need for registered teachers.

Treasury aligned itself with Ministry of Education advice and agreed that all teachers at charter schools must be registered.

“Quality teaching is the most important in-school factor in influencing student achievement,” one report said.

“This directly opposes Associate Minister of Education John Banks’s proposal that charter schools do not need registered teachers, ’’ Mr Goulter says.

“Treasury is saying what we have said all along – charter schools are a waste of money and will not produce any rise in educational achievement. In fact they do the opposite – they increase inequality wherever they have been established and they do not increase parent choice,” says Mr Goulter.

One Treasury report says: “This competition takes place in a context of parents having poor information on which to base their choice of school and empirical evidence that suggests the gains from competition are minimal or negative….”

“We remain sceptical around the student achievement benefits that could be gained from introducing more actively competitive mechanisms into the New Zealand schooling system, such as vouchers, removal of zoning arrangements and increasing financial support for private schools. Systems that have pursued these policies have not gained systematic improvements in student outcomes.

“There are provisions within the current system to increase the diversity of schooling choices available to parents….although these have been used infrequently…..this may indicate that the current level of diversity within the state sector is sufficient to meet parents demands.”

The Treasury advice also addresses Crown involvement in school property and says: “The potential fiscal implications are uncertain as there are a number of design parameters that would influence the fiscal cost.”

It said of capital funding that: “the balance between sponsor and government contribution on capital costs was yet to be determined.”

“They clearly have not done the sums on this. This is going to be an expensive mistake and the taxpayer will be bailing out these failed schools and for what? There is no evidence they increase student achievement,” says Mr Goulter.

To see more go to:

http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/informationreleases/education/partnershipschools
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Super Rugby: Parade To Celebrate Highlanders’ Win

The Dunedin City Council is urging people to come along on Monday to congratulate the team on its win in Wellington tonight. The Highlanders will leave from outside the Dental School at midday. More>>

ALSO:

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news