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New Stronger Voice To Lead Home-Based Ece Sector


JANUARY 8 2013

New Stronger Voice To Lead Home-Based Ece Sector In Government Review

New Zealand’s home-based childcare providers are uniting as a new and stronger voice to lead the sector when it comes under Government review this year.

The Home Education Learning Organisation (HELO) will represent and advocate for home-based early childhood education (ECE) in the teacher-led sector.

Its inaugral members PORSE, PAUA, Au Pair Link and Home Grown Kids represent the majority of children, parents and educators in the home-based sector across New Zealand and are welcoming other home-based providers to join them.

HELO president Jenny Yule said as a national organisation HELO was looking forward to engaging with Government on the upcoming review of home-based ECE and putting forward the views of its members.

“In-home childcare, the fastest growing sector for under two year olds, has for too long been without a strong voice representing us at a Government level. Together, we have the power to be heard, to be recognised and to become a far greater influencer and advocate and to help protect the right for our young children and babies to be cared for and educated in a home environment.”

Ms Yule, who has over 30 years’ broad experience in all facets of education and has successfully grown the trusted brand PORSE, says HELO marks a turning point in the industry.

The home-based sector needs Government to better understand what families and researchers have been saying about the positive benefits that arise for health, housing, work and the economy when home-based childcare and education arrangements work well, she said.

“Home-based ECE currently represents 9% of the ECE sector but has been marginalised by the bigger players, at the expense of not having our babies and young children educated in home and community learning environments, with a one-on-one carer who creates strong relationships to help our young children grow and learn,” Ms Yule said.

HELO members will be presenting evidence-based research in the pending Home-Based ECE review that highlights the social, emotional and financial returns that home-based care and education delivers - not only for under fives, but also for society.

“Young children rely on us big people to get it right – and it’s time to recognise and support the benefits that flow on through our education, health and welfare system when we put our money back into creating safe homes and security for our children from birth,” she says.

HELO’s shared vision is to maintain and raise the standards of the sector with a commitment to working in partnership with the Ministry of Education in order to achieve high quality care and education outcomes with a cost benefit return for the NZ taxpayer.

“We know our New Zealand education, health and welfare system is under-performing and that the finger needs to be pointed back to the changes we can collectively make when working in homes with children, as this is the most important work we undertake as human beings – to love, care and build lifetime relationships,” says Yule.

“HELO believes in quality learning experiences and education from 0 to 5 years in family-focused home environments. Collectively, we represent over 9,000 children and over 4,000 educators, nannies, and au pairs. Our work has been consistently praised by numerous Education Review Office reports and reviews,” says Yule.

“By licensing and reviewing us to such high standards, the Government has already acknowledged the quality services that we deliver to enable young minds to thrive and grow.” HELO is excited about engaging with the review and is confident that the Ministry will appreciate its leadership when consulting with, and seeking feedback from the sector.

The Home Early Learning Organisation (HELO) comprises founding members PORSE, PAUA, Au Pair Link and Home Grown Kids; four of the largest home-based providers in the home-based ECE sector. HELO’s members cater to more than 50% of the children enrolled in home-based services nationwide.


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