Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search


Australia Eyeing up New Zealand Home-Based ECE Model

Australia Eyeing up New Zealand Home-Based ECE Model

Australia could soon follow New Zealand’s popular model of in-home childcare as it undertakes major reforms in its Early Childcare Education (ECE) sector.

New Zealand Home Education Learning Organisation (HELO) president Jenny Yule is fielding strong interest from Australia along with other countries interested in the home-based childcare model.

“Australia is moving ahead of New Zealand with its new childcare reforms that will reduce child to teacher ratios in day care centres.

“We have caught the eye of Australia’s Liberal Member of Parliament Sussan Ley, the Shadow Minister for Childcare and Early Childhood Learning, who visited PORSE last year.

Ms Ley was looking at what other countries have been doing as child care is of critical importance to the Australian Federal Opposition,” Ms Yule said.

Ms Ley said she was very impressed with the PORSE model and she is keen to further consider whether this could play a role in Australia, particularly in regard to the under two year olds.

“We have committed to having our Productivity Commission undertake an inquiry into childcare as a whole and home-based care will certainly be considered within this context. However, this could not occur until we are elected to govern,” Ms Ley said.

Ms Yule said HELO’s founding members (PORSE, PAUA, Au Pair Link and Home Grown Kids) believe the return to care and learning in family homes is the wisest way forward for delivering state-funded early childhood care and education for babies and our young children.

“We need our babies to be raised by people who understand and are committed to the importance of working in close relationships with young children and supporting their families.

“When a baby is born, 70 per cent of their brain is yet to develop. In the first three years of life, almost 90 per cent of the brain development left to be done is undertaken.

“Millions of connections between brain cells are formed, all directly in response to the environment around the child and the experiences that occur within relationship with those who care for them.

“Every adult relationship in a child’s life during the first three years plays a critical role in shaping up a blue-print for their lifetime success.

“Children cared for in the home can receive more consistent one-on-one responsive care, helping them to develop meaningful relationships in a family-focused community, supporting emotional growth and learning,” Ms Yule said.

But Ms Yule said New Zealand could also learn a lot from Australia’s new reforms.

“Here in New Zealand there is real concern about the ‘factory style’ approach to Early Childhood Education. For the past 27 years we have increased our numbers of children in day care to up to 150 for a single centre, however the ratio of care has remained the same at only one adult to five children aged under two years,” she said.

The ratio with home-based childcare is one adult to two children under the age of two years and the ideal group size of four children under five years supports social skills, co-operative play and learning.

“While home-based is the fastest growing ECE sector for children, we still only represent 9 per cent of the industry, with more children being enrolled from birth at out of home, day care services.

“HELO is committed to raising awareness about the benefits of quality home-based care and education, a sector of ECE that is often marginalised by group-based childcare advocates, at the expense of not having our babies and young children educated in home learning environments,” Ms Yule said.

It is a shocking fact that there are 25,000 children diagnosed in New Zealand with behavioural and emotional problems, with anxiety, the fastest growing condition, according to the Ministry of Health's latest children's health report.
Ms Yule backs up what the experts believe is the cause of the increasing rates of anxiety – and supports the government review to examine the benefits of home-based ECE to which she says will reduce stress levels for young children and families, and help re-build neighbourhood communities of learning.

© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Scoop Review Of Books: Worldly And Unworldly

"Being Magdalene" by Fleur Beale The situations shown in this youth novel are shocking, scary, and very moving as we experience Magdalene’s struggle to be a perfect girl as defined by the cruel and unreasonable leader of “The Children of the Faith”, as she moves reluctantly into young womanhood. More>>

Whistle Stop: Netball NZ To Implement New INF Rules

Netball New Zealand (NNZ) will implement the new Official Rules of Netball, as set down by the International Netball Federation (INF), from January 1, 2016. Key changes include the elimination of whistle following a goal, amendments to injury time and changes to setting a penalty. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Waiata Aroha

Vaughan Rapatahana on Chappy by Patricia Grace: With this eminently readable novel Patricia Grace returns to the full-length fiction stage after a hiatus of ten years. More>>

'Ithaca' At Q Theatre: Introducing NZ's World Class Cirque Troupe

NZ’s very own cirque troupe is set to become a household name with the premier of its adaptation of Homer’s Odyssey having secured a key season in Auckland. More>>

Music Awards: The Tuis Are Broody This Year

Topping off a sensationally eventful year both at home and internationally, Nelson born brother-sister duo Broods has taken home four Tuis from this year’s 50th annual Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards. More>>


Sport: Richie McCaw Retires From Rugby

Richie McCaw has today confirmed he is hanging up his boots and retiring from professional rugby. The 34-year-old All Blacks captain and most capped All Black of all time has drawn the curtain on his stunning international career which started in Dublin 14 years ago, almost to the day, and ended in London last month when he hoisted the Webb Ellis Cup aloft for the second time. More>>


John McBeth: On Jonah Lomu

For many New Zealanders, the enormity of Jonah Lomu's reputation will have come as a surprise... His deeds were watched and enthused over by movie stars and musicians, politicians and superstars from other codes. He reached into the lives and homes of millions and mixed with famous people most New Zealanders would only have read about. More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news