Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Erosion of support for higher education raises concerns


Media Release– 21 January 2012 – For Immediate Use


Erosion of support for higher education raises concerns


Auckland University Students’ Association (AUSA) has voiced concern about new pressures being put on postgraduate students enrolling for study in 2013 and the undermining effect of policy changes that unfairly target those students.

“From 1 January the government has removed student allowance eligibility from postgraduate students completing their Masters and Doctorate degrees as well as introducing a wider cap on access to student support beyond 200 weeks,” says Daniel Haines, AUSA President.

“Degrees directly impacted by these changes are those which require postgraduate study in order to become qualified such as psychology or architecture. Students studying medicine, engineering and law are also affected by capping the limit. Medicine is a six year degree, and most law students complete a conjoint degree which requires five years. To complete these degrees, students are now forced to borrow and search for part time jobs, at a time when youth unemployment is at nearly 20%.”

Changes affecting postgraduate students have been estimated to impact on 5000 students across the country and a nationwide student poll under the banner of Keep Our Talent has indicated up to 40% of were considering quitting their studies or looking for better supported opportunities overseas.1

“New Zealand is home to some of the brightest minds in the world, but our true potential will always be held back if there is an underinvestment in our education system. This is also an equity issue. Higher education should not be a privilege for the wealthy but should be a genuine option regardless of one’s background,” says Haines.

Max Lin, AUSA Education Vice-President says the rhetoric that pushing more people into high levels of debt sends the right market signals to prospective students has no substance.

“The only signal it sends is to discourage disadvantaged students from pursuing degrees or higher education which would be most beneficial not only to themselves and to the economy, but to society and their communities. The real problem is it is extremely difficult for students to make this long term trade-off if they will be under severe financial distress,’ said Lin.

AUSA has questioned the insufficient scale of savings that will be created by the cuts, and has backed the call made by Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce to the New Zealand Union of Students’ Associations to independently monitor impacts of this policy change.

1 Bella Duncan Amanda Thomas, "Reinstate Student Allowance Access," (New Zealand: Keep Our Talent, 2012).


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: The Typewriter Factory

I finished reading Don’t Dream It’s Over not long after it came out last August. I even started writing a review, which took something of an ‘I’m sorry people, but it’s already over’ approach. I’ve been pretty negative about journalism as it’s practiced in the mainstream (or MSM, or corporate media or liberal media or whatever terminology you prefer) for quite some time (see for example Stop the Press), and I believe the current capitalist media model is destructive and can’t be reformed. More>>

Sheep Update: Solo World Shearing Record Broken In Southland

Southland shearer Leon Samuels today set a new World solo eight-hours strongwool ewe-shearing after a tally of 605 in a wool shed north of Gore. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Dick Frizzell At The Solander Gallery

One of the most influential and celebrated contemporary Pop artists working in New Zealand, Dick Frizzell is mostly known for his appropriation of kitsch Kiwiana icons, which he often incorporates into cartoon-like paintings and lithographs. Not content with adhering to one particular style, he likes to adopt consciously unfashionable styles of painting, in a manner reminiscent of Roy Lichtenstein. More>>

Old Music: Pop Icon Adam Ant Announces NZ Tour

Following his recent sold out North American and UK tours, Adam Ant is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the release of his landmark KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER album with a newly-remastered reissue (Sony Legacy) and Australasian tour. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Looking Back

Writing a memoir that appeals to a broad readership is a difficult undertaking. As an experienced communicator, Lloyd Geering keeps the reader’s interest alive through ten chapters (or portholes) giving views of different aspects of his life in 20th-century New Zealand. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Purple (and Violet) Prose

This is the second recent conjoint publication by Reeve and Stapp; all to do with esoteric, arcane and obscure vocabulary – sesquipedalian, anyone – and so much more besides. Before I write further, I must stress that the book is an equal partnership between words and images and that one cannot thrive without the other. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news