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Institute To Improve Learning For All

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Institute To Improve Learning For All

New Zealand’s first university-based Institute of Education will focus on improving the learning outcomes for all children.

The newly formed institute replaces the University’s 16-year-old College of Education.

It will be officially launched by Associate Education Minister Nikki Kaye on February 11.

More than 75 people are expected to attend the launch including Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey, Palmerston North MP Iain Lees-Galloway, Palmerston North Mayor Jono Naylor and Manawatū school principals.

The institute will concentrate on graduate and postgraduate teaching and related professional and education qualifications. It will allow its education staff more opportunities to engage in research.

The institute’s interim director Associate Professor Sally Hansen says Massey is leading a revolution in education.

“The vision for the institute is to create an environment for excellence in educational research and postgraduate education that is unmatched in New Zealand and equal to the leading university education institutions of the world,” she says.

“The focus on graduate and postgraduate initial teacher education fits with government’s policy for strong, postgraduate teacher preparation programmes in New Zealand and will enhance the status of the profession and improve the learning outcomes of students in schools.”

Last year Professor Patricia Hardré was announced as the institute’s inaugural head. She has more than 20 years experience in academic leadership at several United States universities and will join Massey later this year.


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