Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


IBM Helps NeSI Make Supercomputers More Widely Available

IBM Helps NeSI Make Supercomputers More Widely Available for Research
University of Otago joins Supercomputing Collaboration

Auckland, New Zealand, 30 January 2013 – IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced that it has provided extra high performance computing (HPC) capacity to the Universities of Auckland and Otago within a new collaboration called the New Zealand eScience Infrastructure (NeSI) that makes large-scale scientific computing more widely available to New Zealand researchers. Otago University is co-funding the latest purchase at The University of Auckland’s Centre for eResearch alongside Landcare Research.

The Centre for eResearch is a major partner in NeSI, a $47M, four year Government and research sector-backed initiative to provide national supercomputing and eScience services to New Zealand researchers. The other NeSI partners are The University of Canterbury and NIWA (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research), both of whom also utilise IBM infrastructure for high performance computing. Other Crown Research Institutes and universities can also purchase time on this cluster (and other NeSI resources) at a heavily discounted rate thanks to the funding provided by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE).

The sale at Auckland University, phase three of a four stage programme, increases the supercomputing platform's processing capacity to around 3,000 CPU cores. IBM General Parallel File System (GPFS™) software ties the IBM System x® iDataPlex® and Linux-based cluster together, enabling efficient job scheduling for the 140 researchers currently using the platform. Migrating projects onto the centrally managed facility is helping provide a more reliable high-performance computing service, and extra staff have been recruited to manage the larger infrastructure and support the many diverse research projects that are now underway.

The Centre for eResearch supports a diverse range of research projects such as:
• Simulating the consequences of different arrangements of windmill turbines laid out in a windfarm to maximise their efficiency.
• Modelling the movements of planets and asteroids around the solar system into the future, to detect possible collisions and near misses.
• Analysing flows of airborne pollutants around a major city, from readings captured from a network of web sensors recording ozone and air quality data every minute.
The new computing power provides a significant boost for scientists previously using desktop computers or ad hoc clusters of PCs to try to scale up their research computing.

“With such an increase in computing power, we are re-setting expectations among scientists about what is possible once they are freed from the limitations of their existing computing resources. The new co-funding agreement with the University of Otago means that their researchers will also gain free access to our augmented HPC facility,” says Prof. Mark Gahegan, Director, Centre for eResearch, University of Auckland. “To help support this growth, we are building relationships with IBM’s global labs to utilise their expertise in high performance computing and apply that experience here in New Zealand.”

“We have quickly estabilshed NeSI as a national research infrastructure, tightly integrated into the research sector and delivering a broad range of computing platforms essential for contemporary science,” says Nick Jones, Director, NeSI. “IBM work closely with our team to deliver platforms for innovation at all three of our national infrastructure facilities, including BlueFern at Canterbury and Fitzroy HPCF at NIWA. With these three national facilities New Zealand researchers now have best in class capability to support cutting edge science, whether engineering, nanomaterials chemistry, drug discovery, or climate change.”

“The extra capacity will allow NeSI to meet pent up demand for advanced computing power from throughout the scientific and research community,” says Prasanna Gulasekharam, Manager, Systems & Technology Group, IBM New Zealand. “We value our relationship with the science and academic communities, leveraging IBM’s own research, technology and skills to increase New Zealand’s overall levels of research for economic growth.”

An extra 60 IBM System x iDataPlex nodes and four dual socket servers, as well as additional storage and virtual machine capability are being provided by IBM.

-Ends-

About IBM New Zealand
More information about IBM may be found at: http://www.ibm.com/nz/en/

About the New Zealand eScience Infrastructure (NeSI)
For more information, see http://www.nesi.org.nz

About the Centre for eResearch
For more information, see http://www.eresearch.auckland.ac.nz

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Excerpt - Ice Bear: The Cultural History Of An Arctic Icon

“During the last decade the image of the polar bear has moved in the public imagination from being an icon of strength, independence and survival in one of the most climatically extreme of world environments, to that of fragility, vulnerability and more generally of a global environmental crisis.” More>>

NZ Opera: Max Rashbrooke Reviews The Mikado

So concerns about the work of the piece have to be addressed; but they are complex, and probably better handled in another post. So what about this production itself? More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: The Typewriter Factory

I finished reading Don’t Dream It’s Over not long after it came out last August. I even started writing a review, which took something of an ‘I’m sorry people, but it’s already over’ approach. I’ve been pretty negative about journalism as it’s practiced in the mainstream (or MSM, or corporate media or liberal media or whatever terminology you prefer) for quite some time (see for example Stop the Press), and I believe the current capitalist media model is destructive and can’t be reformed. More>>

Sheep Update: Solo World Shearing Record Broken In Southland

Southland shearer Leon Samuels today set a new World solo eight-hours strongwool ewe-shearing after a tally of 605 in a wool shed north of Gore. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Dick Frizzell At The Solander Gallery

One of the most influential and celebrated contemporary Pop artists working in New Zealand, Dick Frizzell is mostly known for his appropriation of kitsch Kiwiana icons, which he often incorporates into cartoon-like paintings and lithographs. Not content with adhering to one particular style, he likes to adopt consciously unfashionable styles of painting, in a manner reminiscent of Roy Lichtenstein. More>>

Old Music: Pop Icon Adam Ant Announces NZ Tour

Following his recent sold out North American and UK tours, Adam Ant is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the release of his landmark KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER album with a newly-remastered reissue (Sony Legacy) and Australasian tour. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news