Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search


New Zealand Handles Its National Day Better Than Australia

New Zealand Handles Its National Day Better Than Australia, UC Expert Says

February 5, 2013

New Zealand handles Waitangi Day far better than Australia handles its national day, a University of Canterbury (UC) expert said today.

UC Professor Patrick McAllister has recently published a book on the issue: National Days and the politics of indigenous and local identities in Australia and New Zealand.

He says Waitangi Day is organised in an egalitarian manner, in which both treaty partners have a say. The script is a negotiated one, not one imposed by the state unlike in Australia.

``Issues of concern to Maori can be foregrounded, by Maori themselves, especially at Waitangi’s Te Tii marae, when government ministers and others are formally welcomed there. This year one would expect the question of asset sales and water rights, in particular, to be strongly voiced and debated.

``The organisation and nature of Waitangi Day as it plays out annually at Waitangi reflects the nature of the Treaty partnership as one that needs to be constantly negotiated and which is continually in process, rather than a settled, final agreement.

``Outside of Waitangi itself, local communities are free to organise Waitangi Day activities as they see fit, often with financial support from the state. Local commemorations of Waitangi Day such as the one at Okains Bay near Christchurch, which has been going for over 30 years, are designed by and reflect the interests of local groups and may contrast with the often confrontational nature of events at Waitangi itself.

``This all contrasts strongly with Australia Day, which most indigenous Australians reject as a day worth celebrating. They refer to it as Day of Mourning, Invasion Day or Survival Day, to mark their survival against the odds. The script is designed by the federally-funded Australia Day Council, which has a strong influence on how the day is celebrated both in major cities and in smaller towns and shires.’’

Professor McAllister said there were usually protests by Maori at Waitangi but this was in accordance with the nature of the treaty as something that was continually being negotiated.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Scoop Review Of Books: Worldly And Unworldly

"Being Magdalene" by Fleur Beale The situations shown in this youth novel are shocking, scary, and very moving as we experience Magdalene’s struggle to be a perfect girl as defined by the cruel and unreasonable leader of “The Children of the Faith”, as she moves reluctantly into young womanhood. More>>

Whistle Stop: Netball NZ To Implement New INF Rules

Netball New Zealand (NNZ) will implement the new Official Rules of Netball, as set down by the International Netball Federation (INF), from January 1, 2016. Key changes include the elimination of whistle following a goal, amendments to injury time and changes to setting a penalty. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Waiata Aroha

Vaughan Rapatahana on Chappy by Patricia Grace: With this eminently readable novel Patricia Grace returns to the full-length fiction stage after a hiatus of ten years. More>>

'Ithaca' At Q Theatre: Introducing NZ's World Class Cirque Troupe

NZ’s very own cirque troupe is set to become a household name with the premier of its adaptation of Homer’s Odyssey having secured a key season in Auckland. More>>

Music Awards: The Tuis Are Broody This Year

Topping off a sensationally eventful year both at home and internationally, Nelson born brother-sister duo Broods has taken home four Tuis from this year’s 50th annual Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards. More>>


Sport: Richie McCaw Retires From Rugby

Richie McCaw has today confirmed he is hanging up his boots and retiring from professional rugby. The 34-year-old All Blacks captain and most capped All Black of all time has drawn the curtain on his stunning international career which started in Dublin 14 years ago, almost to the day, and ended in London last month when he hoisted the Webb Ellis Cup aloft for the second time. More>>


John McBeth: On Jonah Lomu

For many New Zealanders, the enormity of Jonah Lomu's reputation will have come as a surprise... His deeds were watched and enthused over by movie stars and musicians, politicians and superstars from other codes. He reached into the lives and homes of millions and mixed with famous people most New Zealanders would only have read about. More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news