Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


New Zealand Handles Its National Day Better Than Australia

New Zealand Handles Its National Day Better Than Australia, UC Expert Says

February 5, 2013

New Zealand handles Waitangi Day far better than Australia handles its national day, a University of Canterbury (UC) expert said today.

UC Professor Patrick McAllister has recently published a book on the issue: National Days and the politics of indigenous and local identities in Australia and New Zealand.

He says Waitangi Day is organised in an egalitarian manner, in which both treaty partners have a say. The script is a negotiated one, not one imposed by the state unlike in Australia.

``Issues of concern to Maori can be foregrounded, by Maori themselves, especially at Waitangi’s Te Tii marae, when government ministers and others are formally welcomed there. This year one would expect the question of asset sales and water rights, in particular, to be strongly voiced and debated.

``The organisation and nature of Waitangi Day as it plays out annually at Waitangi reflects the nature of the Treaty partnership as one that needs to be constantly negotiated and which is continually in process, rather than a settled, final agreement.

``Outside of Waitangi itself, local communities are free to organise Waitangi Day activities as they see fit, often with financial support from the state. Local commemorations of Waitangi Day such as the one at Okains Bay near Christchurch, which has been going for over 30 years, are designed by and reflect the interests of local groups and may contrast with the often confrontational nature of events at Waitangi itself.

``This all contrasts strongly with Australia Day, which most indigenous Australians reject as a day worth celebrating. They refer to it as Day of Mourning, Invasion Day or Survival Day, to mark their survival against the odds. The script is designed by the federally-funded Australia Day Council, which has a strong influence on how the day is celebrated both in major cities and in smaller towns and shires.’’

Professor McAllister said there were usually protests by Maori at Waitangi but this was in accordance with the nature of the treaty as something that was continually being negotiated.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news