Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Maths Report Shows Negative Impact Of Government Policy


7 February, 2013
Immediate Release

Maths Report Shows Negative Impact Of Government Policy

National Standards have already started to negatively impact on children’s learning, a report today shows.

A report by the Education Review Office says that 50 percent of primary schools could make a considerable difference to their students’ maths learning if they were more flexible and adjusted the curriculum to better meet the children’s needs.

But Khandallah Primary School Principal Louise Green says National Standards are an inflexible tool and result in a system where educators are being forced to teach-to-test. It also means important teacher time and resources are taken away, making it more difficult to help struggling students improve in areas such as maths.

The report: Mathematics in Years 4 to 8: Developing a Responsive Curriculum looks at what primary schools are doing to raise maths achievement in students in years 4 to 8.

“Teachers have been concerned for some time that the result of testing and measuring required by National Standards would result in inflexibility in the curriculum. Now we have some proof,’’ she says.

“This is proof that National Standards is a policy that will damage our education system. It does not foster a climate where teachers can be flexible and creative and spend time with children who are struggling.’’

She also said there were no maths advisers attached to the Ministry any more and no money had gone into the Ministry of Education’s Numeracy Project for many years. “The only maths advice we have now is to ensure support and learning around National Standards.”

She says better resourcing was needed so teachers could spend more time with children who were struggling.

“Instead of focussing on compliance, the Ministry needs to return to leading and supporting robust professional development.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Memorabilia: Te Papa Buys Peter Snell Singlet

Te Papa has purchased the singlet worn by Peter Snell at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics at an auction this morning at Cordy’s auction house in Auckland. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Women At The Centre

In the first chapter of her epic History of New Zealand Women, Barbara Brookes places a version of the Māori creation story alongside that of the Pākehā colonists, setting the scene for how each society saw women. The contrast is startling. More>>

In Auckland Art Gallery: A Tour Of Duty

I had already started my journey through the exhibited collections when an audio announcement about a guided tour to embark shortly from the foyer was made, I decided to join in. Why not? More>>

Art: ‘Holiday’ Wins IHC Art Awards

An intricate embroidered cushion by Wellington artist Jo-Anne Tapiki has won the 2016 IHC Art Awards and $5000. Jo-Anne started working from IHC’s Arts on High studio in Lower Hutt 18 months ago and this is the first time she has entered the competition. More>>

‘Quasi’: Christchurch Art Gallery Reveals Rooftop Sculpture

Christchurch-born and internationally renowned artist Ronnie van Hout has had a huge hand in Christchurch Art Gallery's latest outdoor installation. More>>

Obituary: Last 28th Maori Battalion A Company Veteran Dies

Charlie Petera, the final surviving member of A-Company of the 28th Maori Battalion has died at his home in Ngataki, Northland last night surrounded by his whanau. He was 91 years old. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news