Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


School Trustees Question Treasury's Motives

12 February 2013

School Trustees Question Treasury's Motives

Wellington Wairarapa School Trustees Association have concerns that, as was the case with last year’s class size debacle, Treasury are calling the shots over public education, says Chris Toa, Chairperson, WWSTA.

Despite no mandate to do so, and a clear message from the people of the 1990s, Treasury have indicated a preference for bulk funding in schools. It was revealed last week, in documents released under the Official Information Act, that it was Treasury’s plan to prioritise radical workplace reform in education, including bulk funding of teachers' salaries.

Bulk funding risks yet another nail in the coffin of public schooling in New Zealand., warns Mr Toa. School Boards of Trustees under financial pressure would find themselves considering the cost of employing a teacher over the quality or experience of that teacher. It would be a case of the poor getting poorer while the rich got richer. Salaries funded in the present system mean that even the schools facing the most challenges amongst their student body can attract, and pay for, the very best of the teaching community. It creates a degree of equity that bulk funding would destroy.

“The bulk funding move follows the debacle over class sizes, also driven by Treasury. You would have to wonder if they have had a hand in Novopay too” asks Mr Toa. A clear picture is emerging of unjustified attack on the public school system, at the same time propping up certain financially unviable private schools by manipulating their status to allow public funding. The Education Amendment Bill, currently being considered, would take the next step of taxpayers funding Charter Schools who may act without the constraints, measures and legislation present in the public system.

It may suit a National government (and their close associates in the business world) to destabilize public schooling in New Zealand to the point that any parent able to, will opt to pay for private schooling, thus reduce the total number of students, schools and teachers funded in the public system, but it is unlikely to suit the most vulnerable in our society and the fair-minded of us, states Mr Toa. “Trustees believe in a publicly funded education system and every child in New Zealand having the ability to access that quality education. That’s why they stand to be on school boards.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Super Rugby: Parade To Celebrate Highlanders’ Win

The Dunedin City Council is urging people to come along on Monday to congratulate the team on its win in Wellington tonight. The Highlanders will leave from outside the Dental School at midday. More>>

ALSO:

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news