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PM's School of Choice Gets 40% Funding Increase in Two Years

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Dominion Road


15 April 2013

Media Release:

Prime Minister Increases Kings College Funding By An Eye-Watering 40% In Just Two Years

Today’s revelation that the government is giving active consideration to increasing state subsidies to private schools in the budget (RNZ story today) is another sickening example of the National/Act/Maori Party government’s distorted priorities.

Government subsidies to private schools have increased dramatically since John Key took office four years ago.

When public schools are being told funding is limited in tough economic times the government has been pouring money hand over fist into elite private schools which are the schools of choice for National/Act cabinet ministers.

For example at the Prime Minister’s school of choice for his son, Kings College, government subsidies increased by an eye-watering 40% ($1,663,585 to $2,325,587) from 2009 to 2011.

The figures for all private schools are shocking.

Consider these examples:

Kings College1,663,585 2,152,669 2,325,587
St Cuthbert’s2,027,070 2,553,203 2,836,908
Kristin School2,222,284 2,734,602 2,912,394
AGC Parnell789,880 1,206,459 1,426,547
Diocesan School2,057,681 2,740,298 2,940,455
Scot’s College1,072,9201,378,0841,509,437
Christ’s College1,172,637 1,461,804 1,633,170
Rangi Ruru1,160,0131,446,8971,580,950

Less than 4% of New Zealand children attend private schools and yet they have become the first priority for National in its education policy release.

In the lead-up to the budget QPEC urges the government to abandon plans to put another layer of icing on the private school cake and instead provide extra funding for the schools expected to educate the increasing numbers of victims of the government’s economic policies.

Click here to read list of funding paid to private schools Funds_4_November_2012.pdf

John Minto

National Chairperson


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