Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Research Into Young People With Brain Injury Who Offend

UC Research Looking Into Young People With Brain Injury Who May Later Offend

April 22, 2013

Young people who suffer traumatic brain injury can have behavior problems and a University of Canterbury (UC) adjunct professor is investigating whether there is evidence of increased risk of offending behavior among this group of people.

Falls are the most common source of traumatic brain injury (TBI) for children under 15 and fights, sporting injuries and motor vehicle accidents are the most common forms of TBI for those over 15. The UC research is in collaboration with Monash University in Melbourne.

Monash’s Dr Audrey McKinlay, who is a UC adjunct, says the major objective is to investigate the number of young people who, following a TBI in childhood, later suffer mental disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conduct disorder, mood disorders, substance abuse or anxiety.

``These disorders are associated with an increased risk of offending behaviour, so we also want to find out whether there is evidence of increased offending behaviour among this population,’’ Dr McKinlay says.

``TBI accounts for over three percent of all hospital admissions and costs the Accident Compensation Corporation around $100 million a year for post-acute treatment and rehabilitation. Therefore, the development of interventions aimed at reducing adverse outcomes will have a major cost benefit.

``A recent ACC report said that in Christchurch city alone, 554 children and young people in 2004 were treated at Christchurch Hospital for a TBI.

``Behavioural problems are reported as the most difficult TBI outcome to manage. The resulting unmanaged behaviour commonly leads to expulsion from school, rejection by peers and difficulties with siblings.

``The lack of attention to rehabilitation efforts in the early stages of recovery makes secondary problems such as disruptive behaviour, alcohol and substance abuse and youth offending more likely,” Dr McKinlay says.

TBI affects one in five children by the age of 15. When psychiatric symptoms emerge, the connection with TBI is rarely made. The mechanisms that result in young people with TBI coming into contact with youth justice or mental health services remain unknown.

The UC-Monash research will identify environmental, cultural and individual characteristics of young people with TBI who engage in antisocial behaviour requiring interventions, and will provide an opportunity for prevention.

``Identifying the characteristics of individuals with TBI who become users of mental health and youth justice services will provide a valuable first step towards development of strategies for prevention. Early intervention is likely to reduce high costs, but identification of at risk children is required.

``Our initial research has shown that young people who sustain a traumatic brain injury, even of only a mild severity, are four to six times more likely to develop psychiatric disorders such as ADHD and conduct disorder compared to the general population, especially if the injury occurs in the pre-school years.”

The findings will be reported to the International Brain Injury Association, the Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment and at the New Zealand College of Clinical Psychologist conference.



ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Māori Language Week: He Karanga Kia Kaha Ake Te Tīhau Ki Te Reo Māori

The Māori Language Commission wishes to see social media swamped with Māori language tweets and messages for Te Wiki o te Reo Māori using the hashtag #tekupu. More>>

ALSO:

Book Vote: Kiwis Prefer Young Adult & Classics

To compile their Top 100 List for 2014, Whitcoulls again asked New Zealanders to vote for their favourite books and authors. And while classic novels continue to appeal to Kiwi readers, 2014 marks a significant new trend – the increasing popularity of novels for young adults. More>>

ALSO:

Five NZ Cities: Bill Bailey Back To The Southern Hemisphere

The gap between how we imagine our lives to be and how they really are is the subject of Bill’s new show Limboland. With his trademark intelligence and sharp wit, he tells tales of finding himself in this halfway place. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Book Television Is Coming

Carole Beu of The Women’s Bookshop in Auckland, Graham Beattie of The Book Blog and producer Deb Faith of FaceTV have raised enough money via crowd funding at Boosted – just under $7,000 so far – for 12 episodes, which begin production in September, and will be on screen later that month. More>>

Electric Sheep: Light Nelson Exceeds All Expectations

Light Nelson exceeded all expectations drawing over 40,000 people over two nights to the Queens Gardens and surrounds. The event, with over 40 installations from local and national artists, is in its second year, and organisers were hoping they’d top last year’s crowd of 16,000. More>>

MacGyver: Richard Dean Anderson To Attend Armageddon This October

New Zealand’s biggest pulp-culture event, the Armageddon Expo is proud to announce the world’s most recognised DIY action hero will be attending the Auckland event at the ASB Showgrounds from October 24th to 27th. More>>

ALSO:

Barbershop Gold: Māori Party Singing Praises Of The Musical Island Boys

The Maori Party has congratulated four young men on a mission, who in 2002 took up barbershop singing at Tawa College, and tonight took out the Gold Medal in the 2014 International Barbershop Harmony Society competitions in Las Vegas. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news