Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Pacific success in tertiary education

MEDIA RELEASE

3 May 2013

Pacific success in tertiary education

Why do some Pacific students do well at tertiary education, while others find it more difficult to complete their qualifications?

This was one focus for Victoria University researcher and education lecturer Dr Cherie Chu, who looked at identifying, understanding and sharing educational practices in tertiary institutions that benefit Pacific learners.

The research, which was funded by the Ako Aotearoa National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence, identified three key factors that led to success for Pacific in tertiary settings.

“This included family support and personal commitment, positive teaching and learning relationships that recognised cultural identity, values and aspirations,” says Dr Chu, “as well as commitment from the particular institution to provide significant Pacific role models, a strong and supportive leadership and actively engagement with the Pacific community.”

Dr Chu spent two years talking to 51 staff and 119 students at five tertiary institutes around New Zealand, including Victoria and Otago universities, the Manukau Institute of Technology, Pacific Training Institute and Whitireia New Zealand. Along with two PhD students, Ivy Samala Abella and Seann Paurini, Dr Chu interviewed staff and students of varying ages and gender from a range of academic disciplines in both degree and diploma courses.

Her research focused on the positive. “So much of the research over the past 30 or 40 years has been about the negative, looking at non-participation rates of Pacific students, those who drop out of tertiary study or who don’t complete their qualifications. I wanted to understand and appreciate what tertiary institutions are doing well for Pacific learners.”

Data was gathered using the Talanoa research tool, which allows for a more informal, unstructured interview format by developing collaborative relationships between people.

“The Talanoa process allows for participants to share their stories, realities and aspirations in a more culturally appropriate way than if they were in structured focus groups. Talanoa is increasingly being used as a research method by Pacific researchers across New Zealand.”

Dr Chu says the research has far-reaching implications for both students and tertiary institutions.

“The one-size-fits-all approach to education doesn’t work anymore. Institutions need to ensure their staff, policies and teaching better reflects students’ culture and relationships. When Pacific learners are empowered as confident learners, they are successful.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news