Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Quality of early childhood service review

New ERO review reports give parents a clear signal about the quality of early childhood education.

The Education Review Office is making it easier for parents to find out about the quality of an early childhood service.

As part of its new approach to reviewing early childhood services, ERO has introduced four different review return times. Each one is connected to an overall judgement about how well placed a service is to promote positive outcomes for children. The better placed a service is to promote positive outcomes, the longer the time between education reviews.

Diana Anderson, Acting Chief Executive and Chief Review Officer for ERO, says that the changes are about giving a clear judgement and making sure that ERO and the Ministry of Education use their resources where they are needed the most.

“Early childhood is a growing and diverse sector. The four different return times give us the flexibility to spend more time in early childhood services that need support, and less time with those that consistently provide high quality early childhood education,” says Mrs Anderson.

Previously, early childhood services were reviewed every three years, with ERO returning within 12 months to services with which they had concerns.

ERO has developed criteria to support the four judgements. The criteria are available publicly and make it clear what ERO expects for a service to be considered very well placed.

Shorter and easier to read education reports are also part of ERO’s new approach. The outcome of the review will be immediately obvious as the report will start with the overall judgement.

“We want parents to have access to good information about early childhood services,” says Mrs Anderson. “As an independent evaluation agency, we review hundreds of early childhood services each year. Not only do we get to see a wide variety of early childhood services, but we also aim to report what we found in a way that helps parents make a decision about early childhood education for their family.”

Other significant changes to the early childhood reviews include an increased focus on a service’s self review – what the service knows about the impact their service has, how they know this and what they do with that information. ERO also wants to be sure that early childhood services are helping priority learners – Māori, Pacific and children with special learning needs. Children up to the age of two are also a priority for ERO.

*ERO has separate review procedures for kōhanga reo. Home-based education and care services and hospital-based education and care services will still be reviewed under the 2002 procedures.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Auckland: St. Jerome's Laneway Festival - Line-Up Announced

Traversing seven cities and three countries, the festival has well and truly settled into its home in each state. From the grassy knolls and towering silos at home in Auckland, to the sparkling backdrop of the Maribyrnong... More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: No Longer An Island

Simon Nathan reviews 'Zealandia: Our Continent Revealed': The idea that New Zealand is part of a large submerged continent is not new... There was renewed interest in the extent of offshore New Zealand from the 1970s onwards with the start of offshore drilling for oil and gas, and this was given impetus by a UN agreement which allowed countries to claim an Extended Continental Shelf (ECS). More>>

Art: Simon Denny Recreates Kim Dotcom’s Personal Effects

Who owns what? How has the internet changed our relation to the world? These are two of the many questions Simon Denny raises in the latest exhibition at the Adam Art Gallery, opening on Saturday 4 October. More>>

Theatre: The F Word: Sex Without The 'ism'

Sex without the 'ism' Okay, so the sexes are equal in the eyes of the law. What the F happens now? More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Don’t Eat The Fish

On 'The Catch' by Michael Field What the ecologically edible lists don’t appear to take into account – and they should – is slavery... It’s not an easy read, but it’s definitely near the top of my listicle of “5 Political Books You Must Read This Year”. More>>

ALSO:

Caracals: Small Cats With Big Ears Arrive At Wellington Zoo

Visitors to Wellington Zoo will be able to see New Zealand’s first Caracals in the Zoo’s new Grassland Cats habitat, with a special visitor opening day on Saturday 27 September. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: Classics - Tales From Moominvalley
Can’t speak for the reading end of it but the Moomins ( or maybe the story about Margaret Wise Brown) were the most enjoyable subject to think about and write about during these whole first 50 issues of Werewolf. For that reason – and because the Moomins always reward re-reading – I’ve decided to reprint it. The only added element is a link to an interesting hour long documentary about Tove Jansson. More>>

ALSO:

Repping In The Pacific: All Blacks And Manu Samoa To Play Historic Apia Test

The All Blacks will play Manu Samoa in Apia on Wednesday 8 July next year as part of both teams’ preparations for Rugby World Cup 2015. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news