Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


New role to address economics of disasters


New role to address economics of disasters

A Chair in the Economics of Disasters which has been established at Victoria University will provide new knowledge to guide New Zealand in the aftermath of disasters like the Canterbury earthquakes.

The Chair, believed to be a world first, will be focused on economic policy and disaster management and is the result of a partnership between Victoria University, the Earthquake Commission (EQC) and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI). Professor Ilan Noy from Victoria’s School of Economics and Finance has been appointed to the new role.

Professor Noy’s research will investigate economic aspects of the management of natural and other disasters.

Although there are centres of research and policy development concentrating on disasters in New Zealand, none have an economic focus.

“The establishment of this Chair is another important step by the Victoria Business School as it increases engagement and partnerships with our stakeholders to improve knowledge and capability in strategically important areas,” says Professor Bob Buckle, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Commerce at Victoria Business School.

“I am delighted that MPI and EQC have joined with us to support a new Chair that concentrates on understanding the economic consequences of natural and other types of disasters, and on policy options to mitigate their consequences.

“Our limits were tested in the aftermath of the Canterbury earthquakes, and we continue to be challenged, for example, by the continuous border risks to the horticultural industry. Understanding the economic consequences of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, droughts, floods, viruses and bio-security risks helps inform private and public policy decisions around investment in mitigation, preparation and response processes. The aim of this Chair is to help inform decision making on these questions and thereby try to reduce the social and economic costs of disasters.”

Originally from Israel, Professor Noy came to Victoria in 2011 from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa, where he was an Associate Professor in Economics. His research and teaching interests include the economics of disasters, international finance and development economics.

“We need to develop evidence-based solutions to deal with the long-term aftermath of the Canterbury quakes, and to be better prepared for the next disaster heading our way; be it another earthquake, a drought or a virus,” says Professor Noy.

“Many countries are struggling to frame coherent prevention, mitigation and reconstruction policy in the wake of disasters, and I hope to be able to assist in this effort.”

Both central and local government were widely consulted during the development of the role.

Over the last few years, Victoria Business School has established a number of Chairs involving partnership with the public and private sectors through the Victoria University Foundation. These include the Chair in Public Finance and the Chair in e-Government.

ends



© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news