Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Students to ‘launch’ exhibition

4 July 2013

Students to ‘launch’ exhibition

Who doesn’t want to build a real catapult? The 16 local school students who have taken up the chance to build scale Roman Onager torsion catapults do, that’s for sure.

UCOL is running the catapult-building programme as part of the Secondary Tertiary Alignment Resource (STAR), created to allow Year 11-13 students the opportunity to explore their potential and help give direction to their further education or employment.

UCOL Head of School for the Built Environment Danny Reilly says the STAR programme is being run in conjunction with Te Manawa to celebrate the opening of the Roman Machines exhibition on 13 July.

“For these motivated school students with an interest in history or who just like to get hands on, they will gain new skills in team work, engineering, and an appreciation of Roman technology.

“Seeing youth move successfully from school into tertiary education is really important to us, and these students get to have a taste of what tertiary education is like so there is less fear of the unknown.”

The students have completed two theory sessions at Te Manawa and will start building the catapults this Friday at UCOL’s Trades & Technology Centre in Palmerston North. They will then complete the building on Friday 12 July, before testing the structures in The Square on Saturday 13 July – the opening day of Te Manawa’s Roman Machines exhibition.

The test day in The Square will see the students competing against each other to see who gets the best performance out of their catapult.

The catapults will be on display in The Square from 10am and the winner of the competition will be presented with a ‘roman medal’ at an Olympic ceremony at Te Manawa later in the day.

Te Manawa Chief Executive Andy Lowe says, “One of the things I love about this is the synergy between UCOL, Te Manawa, the schools, 22AD, volunteers, ITM who supplied materials. It’s about energy and creating an incredible experience together out of pure passion.”

All UCOL campuses offer STAR programmes. For more info on the trades programmes UCOL offers please visit www.ucol.ac.nz.

For more information about Te Manawa’s Roman Machines exhibit please visit www.temanawa.co.nz.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news