Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Conference to unearth NZ’s constitutional traditions


MEDIA ADVISORY


26 August 2013

Conference to unearth New Zealand’s constitutional traditions

A conference organised by Victoria University’s Faculty of Law aims to shed light on the fundamental ideals on which New Zealand’s constitutional law is based.

Hosted by Hon Chris Finlayson QC, Attorney-General of New Zealand, Unearthing New Zealand’s Constitutional Traditions will explore the history, and possible future, of the ideas, ideals and practices of constitutional law and politics which govern the exercise of public power in this country.

“By understanding these ideals we will be able to better understand the constitutional principles by which we should judge the exercise of public power,” says conference co-organiser, Dr Mark Bennett.

Dr Bennett says that in light of continuing debates about issues such as the place of the Treaty of Waitangi in our constitution, the framework of our democracy and various political and legal controversies surrounding the use of public power, taking a closer look at our constitutional ideals could not be more timely.
Keynote speakers are Emeritus Professor Andrew Sharp, University of Auckland and Honorary Research Fellow at Birkbeck, University of London; and Professor David Hackett Fischer, University Professor and Earl Warren Professor of History, Brandeis University.

Professor Sharp is an expert on the history of political thinking and political philosophy who has spent much of his career inquiring into the political ideas and constitutional histories of New Zealand and England.

Professor Fischer is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian who has recently written the book Fairness and Freedom: A History of Two Open Societies, which compares the fundamental political ideals of the United States and New Zealand.

“The conference brings together a range of perspectives provided by legal academics, historians and lawyers with experience in government and practice,” says conference co-organiser Dr Joel Colón-Ríos.

“It will reflect on important questions directed at unearthing the country’s tradition of constitutional thought, and what New Zealand’s constitution should look like in the future.”

This conference is part of a programme of events at the Faculty of Law which coincide with the Constitutional Conversation, taking place as part of the Government’s Constitutional Review.

It is another aspect of the New Zealand Centre for Public Law’s contribution to the Conversation—earlier this year it held a series of debates to discuss issues relating to the Constitutional Review. Both events have benefitted from generous financial support from the New Zealand Law Foundation.

Unearthing New Zealand’s Constitutional Traditions
Date: 29–30 August
Venue: Parliament Buildings, Wellington

For more information visit www.victoria.ac.nz/law/about/events-old/nz-centre-for-public-law/nzcpl-conference-unearthing-new-zealands-constitutional-traditions

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news