Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Earthquakes produced enduring physical, mental health impact

Earthquakes produced enduring physical and mental health impact on people

August 27, 2013

The 2010 and 2011 earthquakes have produced an enduring physical and mental health impact on Christchurch people, a University of Canterbury (UC) expert says.

UC research conducted in the Canterbury region has consistently pointed to an enduring effect on people’s health and also shown the importance of a long-term approach to workers and community support. UC students fared well overall following the earthquakes and one key reason was the peer support from colleagues at the University.

Psychology researcher Dr Joana Kuntz says although a number of earthquake-related studies have been conducted in the working population for the past couple of years, little is known about the impact of major disasters on students’ psychological health and general attitudes.

Along with Dr Katharina Naswall and postgraduate student Sonja Rae, Dr Kuntz will give a presentation on resilience at the first New Zealand Tertiary Engagement Summit at UC on Friday (August 30).

``Our study investigated the relationships between perceptions of institutional (university) support, social support, feelings of burnout, academic performance and perceived employability among third and fourth year students at UC.

``Third year students were selected because they were at the earliest stage of their tertiary education path in February 2011 and were expected to be at greater risk of emotional exhaustion, academic disengagement and perceptions of employability in a recovering university and city.

``Research has consistently shown that both wellbeing and perceived employability are critical factors contributing to job seekers’ motivation and success in finding a job.

``Our results show that perceptions of both immediate and extended university support for students after the earthquakes, but particularly of the support extended over the past three years, have been invaluable in the recovery process. Institutional support was associated with lower feelings of burnout and work overload, and higher perceptions of employability.

``Social support – from family and peers – was also related to lower levels of emotional exhaustion and academic disengagement, and a more optimistic outlook regarding career prospects.

``With regards to academic performance, there were some differences between the undergraduate and postgraduate groups surveyed. While the grade point average of current fourth year students have increased steadily since 2010, the grade point average of third year students was lower in 2012 than in 2011, rising again to their highest level in the first semester of this year.’’

Vincent Ilustre, executive director at Tulane University’s Centre for Public Service in New Orleans, will be the keynote speaker at UC’s summit on Friday.

The summit is part of a drive by UC to engage closely with the community. Already more than 400 students have been involved in UC’s CHCH101 course, launched after the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, to build on the Student Volunteer Army’s community engagement work.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: No Longer An Island

Simon Nathan reviews 'Zealandia: Our Continent Revealed': The idea that New Zealand is part of a large submerged continent is not new... There was renewed interest in the extent of offshore New Zealand from the 1970s onwards with the start of offshore drilling for oil and gas, and this was given impetus by a UN agreement which allowed countries to claim an Extended Continental Shelf (ECS). More>>

Art: Simon Denny Recreates Kim Dotcom’s Personal Effects

Who owns what? How has the internet changed our relation to the world? These are two of the many questions Simon Denny raises in the latest exhibition at the Adam Art Gallery, opening on Saturday 4 October. More>>

Theatre: The F Word: Sex Without The 'ism'

Sex without the 'ism' Okay, so the sexes are equal in the eyes of the law. What the F happens now? More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Don’t Eat The Fish

On 'The Catch' by Michael Field What the ecologically edible lists don’t appear to take into account – and they should – is slavery... It’s not an easy read, but it’s definitely near the top of my listicle of “5 Political Books You Must Read This Year”. More>>

ALSO:

Caracals: Small Cats With Big Ears Arrive At Wellington Zoo

Visitors to Wellington Zoo will be able to see New Zealand’s first Caracals in the Zoo’s new Grassland Cats habitat, with a special visitor opening day on Saturday 27 September. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: Classics - Tales From Moominvalley
Can’t speak for the reading end of it but the Moomins ( or maybe the story about Margaret Wise Brown) were the most enjoyable subject to think about and write about during these whole first 50 issues of Werewolf. For that reason – and because the Moomins always reward re-reading – I’ve decided to reprint it. The only added element is a link to an interesting hour long documentary about Tove Jansson. More>>

ALSO:

Repping In The Pacific: All Blacks And Manu Samoa To Play Historic Apia Test

The All Blacks will play Manu Samoa in Apia on Wednesday 8 July next year as part of both teams’ preparations for Rugby World Cup 2015. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news