Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Putting the public back into public education

Putting the public back into public education

“The High Court decision on the proposed merger of Phillipstown School is a victory for common sense and the little guys”, says Quality Public Education Coalition Chairperson, Bill Courtney.

“Surely it is time for this government to stop and listen to public concern about the Christchurch Renewal Plan and how poorly it has been developed. But above all, it is time to put the public back into public education.”

Concerns were raised some time back that the Christchurch Renewal Plan was hastily put together and lacking credibility.

Often the figures and calculations given to justify a closure or merger were not convincing, and in fact caused confusion. The effect was to give the impression that the decision regarding a particular school or schools has been made first, and the evidence assembled afterwards.

Justice Fogarty has, quite rightly, found that the Ministry’s consultation process failed to meet the requirements of the Education Act.

In particular, Justice Fogarty found that the financial information that Minister Parata relied upon for her decision was not reasonably broken down and explained in a manner that would have enabled a critique.

In many cases in Christchurch, the figures for rebuilding or repairing schools were often markedly worse than independent assessments obtained by schools. There were also exaggerations in the amount of damage stated.

The Ministry documents make the Ministry’s consideration of school mergers or closures appear superficially logical and thoughtful, but this is not the case when the documents are examined carefully.

It has been a frustrating business for affected schools to try and counter these pseudo arguments.

QPEC has made a submission to the on-going inquiry being undertaken by the Chief Ombudsman, Dame Beverley Wakem, into the Christchurch school “consultation” process.

QPEC feels strongly that consultation must be a reality, not a charade; sufficiently precise information must be given; reasonable opportunity must be given to form a view and respond; and the government MUST be prepared to listen to the views of those who are being consulted.

But above all, it must be recognised that public schools are public assets and the broader public must also be given an opportunity to submit views, not just the parents of those who are currently involved with the school.

It is time to put the public back into public education.”

ENDS.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Werewolf: Music Criticism As A Dating Metaphor

Music criticism can be just another form of consumer advic... Yet ever since pop music criticism first entered the media mainstream it has played a wider role, too. Rather than a decree with a numerical score attached, this kind of criticism functions more like travel notes. A conversation, even a form of seduction. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news