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Top Manawatū student-athletes named

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Top Manawatū student-athletes named


BNZ Massey University Manawatū Sportswoman of the Year Sarah Goss

Rugby player Sarah Goss and taekwon-do champion Kane Baigent were named the sportswoman and man of the year at the BNZ Manawatū Blues Awards last night.

The Blues Awards, presented in association with BNZ, are presented to students in recognition of their outstanding achievements in both sport and academic studies. Previous recipients include Hamish Bond, Lisa Carrington, Simon Child and Juliette Haigh.

Ms Goss is studying towards a Bachelor of Arts in Māori Studies and is vice-captain of the New Zealand Sevens rugby team that won this year’s Women’s World Cup and the IRB Women’s World Series.

Mr Baigent (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise) made the quarterfinals at the International taekwon-do World Cup. He won three gold medals at last year’s National Championships and three gold, one silver and one bronze at this year’s event.

World champion sailor Jo Aleh (Bachelor of Business Studies) was named BNZ Massey University Distance Student Sportswoman of the Year. She won this year’s 470 World Championship and was second at the European Championship.

Softballer Jeremy Manley (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise) was named BNZ Massey University Distance Student Sportsman of the Year. Mr Manley is a member of the New Zealand Black Sox Team that won this year’s World Series Championship. He won the Kevin Herlihy Most Valuable Pitcher Award as top pitcher in the world series.

An outstanding contribution award was presented to Lorraine Emery and Russell Tillman for their work with the Massey Hockey Club.

Sports presenter Hamish McKay was master of ceremonies at this year’s event and Olympian and Massey student Sarah Cowley was guest speaker.

Ms Cowley, a Bachelor of Communication student, represented New Zealand in the heptathlon at the London Olympics in 2012 and is now competing in the high jump, as she sets her sights on a gold medal at the next Commonwealth Games. She shared her experiences as a high-performance athlete juggling academic studies.

Blues awards will be presented to Albany students at an event in Auckland on Thursday.

Blues were awarded to (Manawatū, Wellington and Distance Learning):

ATHLETICS
Sarah Cowley
Ben Langton-Burnell
Jordan Peters
Ashleigh Sando

BASKETBALL
Nicholas Fee

BMX
Nick Fox

CANOE POLO
Carl Duncan

CANOE SPRINT
Lisa Carrington

CRICKET
Kate Broadmore
Craig Cachopa
Dean Robinson

CYCLING
Emily Collins
Brad Evans
Cameron Karwowski
Stephanie McKenzie

EQUESTRIAN
Chloe Akers
Tayla Mason
Melody Matheson
Virginia Thompson
Nicola French
Catherine West

FOOTBALL
Rebecca Smith
Rosie Missen

HOCKEY
Jake Blanks
Matthew Brougham
Samantha Charlton
Mitchell Cronin
Michaela Curtis
Glenn Eyers
Elizabeth Horne
Brooke Karam
Arun Panchia
Elizabeth Redwood
Oscar Stewart
Brearna Wiig

MOUNTAIN BIKING
Samara Sheppard
Sasha Smith

MUAYTHAI KICKBOXING
Janna Vaughan

ROWING
Genevieve Behrent
Toby Cunliffe-Steel
Sarah Gray
Nathan Flannery
James Lassche
Peter Taylor

RUGBY
Nick Crosswell
Nick Grogan
Travis Taylor
Hamish Northcott

RUGBY SEVENS
Sarah Goss

SAILING
Molly Meech

SOFTBALL
Jeremy Manley

SQUASH
Danielle Fourie
Rebecca Barnett

SURF LIFESAVING
Tash Hind

SWIMMING
Dylan Dunlop-Barrett
Mary Fisher
Tash Hind
Nielsen Varoy

TABLE TENNIS
Natalie Paterson

TAEKWON-DO
Michael Davis
Kane Baigent

TRIATHLON
Hayden Moorhouse

WHITE WATER KAYAK
Malcolm Gibson
Louise Jull

ENDS

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