Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


25 UC students work on entrepreneurial projects over summer

25 UC students working on entrepreneurial projects over the summer

January 5, 2014

Twenty-five University of Canterbury (UC) students are working on entrepreneurial projects over the summer rather than relaxing at the beach.

The students are part of UC Innovation’s Hatchery and their summer scholarships allow them to delve further into their business ideas so they can become a reality.
UC’s Dr Chris Kirk, Director of Strategic Projects, says some of the concepts include teaching apps for students with disabilities, measuring coal stockpiles, exporting thar as meat, software tools for the construction sector, retail business for sports gear, a new type of roasting coffee company, clothes for rural women and delivering food to students flats.

The construction sector project aims to develop smart easy-to-use on-site apps to support health and safety on building projects and the students have already formed an alliance with major construction companies to fast-track implementation of their idea.

``The thar project is hugely ambitious. The students are scoping out the viability of a new export industry for New Zealand and the project has many parallels with the early stages of setting up the deer farming industry.

``The students retain all rights to their intellectual property. They are all co-located together in a new dedicated entrepreneurial space at the university called the Hatchery, the first of its kind in New Zealand.

``They have mentors to offer professional guidance and support at the Hatchery, managed by Dr Rachel Wright. Scholarships for this inaugural summer start-up programme were provided by a combination of external sponsors and the university.’’

One of the students, Hannah Duder, has produced a phone app, The Suggestion Box, which enables any business to gather useful customer feedback quickly and easily. Her entrepreneurial talent has developed with the help of the Hatchery. The app is now downloadable for Apple and android cellphones.

Another postgraduate student, Tariq Habibyar, is putting books in the hands of Afghan children through the virtual world and distributing to villages in Afghanistan as part of his PhD research project. He has a goal of seeing five million Afghan children having access to his books by 2020.

Commerce graduate student Kate Austin is working on a grocery shopping outlet that allows Canterbury farmers and growers to sell their goods direct to the customer, seven days a week. This hunters and gatherers scheme will allow Cantabrians to buy their groceries from the butcher, the baker and the fruit and vegetable shop all under one roof, knowing that it has come to the shelves directly and can be traced back to their origin.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news