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Students Gain Perfect Scores in International Qualification

Students Gain Perfect Scores in International Qualification


Two Queen Margaret College students were awarded perfect scores in the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Both Shruti Iyer and Tamara Jenkin gained marks of 45; they join just two others from New Zealand and 217 around the globe.

In 2013 students from 2,463 schools in over 140 counties participated in the IB Diploma. This is a two year pre-university course, which can be completed in place of Year 12 and 13 NCEA in New Zealand.

New Zealand currently has thirteen Colleges offering this international qualification, which has been running since 1968. Initially a qualification created for globally mobile families, it has become increasingly appealing for students who desire a broader internationally focused education.

At Queen Margaret College a further four students gained marks of over 40. All six girls will receive special recognition in the New Zealand IB Diploma Award Ceremony annually held at Premier House in Auckland with other New Zealand students who have gained marks of over 40.

“I offer my congratulations to all our IB Diploma students, in particular Tamara and Shruti, for their hard work and dedication over this two year programme. It is a tribute to the students and their teachers. We are all tremendously proud of their accomplishments.” Principal Carol Craymer comments.

“We deliver a dual qualification pathway, which prepares students for their choice of either IB Diploma or NCEA. The College currently has a 50/50 split between the two qualifications, as students are selecting the path that suits their unique ambitions and skills.”

The IB Diploma is known for its breadth and width. All students study six subjects, including their first language, a second language, a science, mathematics and a social science. It is also where East meets West with students in New Zealand studying the same Chemistry, Mathematics or French course as those in China.

The College’s average mark in 2013 was 34, while the global average was 30. Queen Margaret College is heading into its fifth year offering the IB Diploma and remains the only school in the lower North Island where girls can complete the qualification.

What is the IB Diploma?

A two-year qualification, widely regarded as the gold standard of global educational qualifications providing entry to universities in this country and all round the world.

The IB Diploma programme is known for its breadth and width. All students study six subjects, including their first language, a second language, a science, mathematics and a social science. Marks are also allocated for the 4,000 word Extended Essay which has them engage in independent research and Theory of Knowledge course designed to encourage critical thinking. In addition students undertake an extra-curricular programme (CAS) where they participate in sports, arts and community service. This is a refreshing counterbalance to academic studies.

The IB Diploma is marked on a worldwide scale, where each subject is graded from one (lowest) to seven (highest possible score) for all six subjects. Students must achieve a total of 24 points and fulfil other criteria in order to receive the IB Diploma. The marks are internationally moderated so the same standards apply throughout the world.

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