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Farmax announces $5000 Lincoln Uni scholarship

MEDIA RELEASE
15 January 2014

Farmax announces $5000 Lincoln University postgrad research scholarship


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Geoff Smith, inaugural recipient of the Farmax Lincoln Scholarship in 2013

Hamilton, New Zealand – Pastoral management software company Farmax announced today that it will provide one Lincoln University postgraduate researcher a $5000 scholarship in 2014.

Second year PhD student Geoffrey Smith took last year’s prize to advance his research into the strategic use of the drought tolerant species Lucerne as an alternative or complementary forage to ryegrass for Canterbury dairy farms.

Smith’s research, which finishes this year, is using Farmax to model both animal and economic performance under different whole farm system scenarios – including the amount of Lucerne in the milking platform pasture, with adjusted stocking rates, calving dates, supplement and nitrogen use.

Farmax general manager Gavin McEwen said the scholarship is open to anyone eligible to perform postgraduate research at Lincoln University in Canterbury whose agricultural research project uses Farmax decision support and modelling software products.

“The selection committee will award the scholarship to a student whose research has potential to ultimately benefit New Zealand farmers, as this objective aligns with our core company values.”

McEwen said Farmax is based on decades of research and is one of the industry’s best tools for informing fact-based farm management.

“Through this scholarship we want to encourage and contribute to the country’s next generation of agricultural scientists and rural professionals because we know research can translate into huge benefits for farmers. That’s why we’re committed to investing in the next generation of agricultural scientists.”

The Farmax scholarship covers a period of 12 months. It is open to both current students and those intending to apply to study at the University. Applications close on 30 March.

An application form can be downloaded from the Lincoln Scholarships database www.lincoln.ac.nz/scholar or obtained by phoning the Lincoln University Scholarships Office on (03) 325 2811.

ENDS

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