Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Ministry of Education praised for improving achievement

Ministry of Education praised for improving achievement, retention
Resource information


States Services Commissioner Iain Rennie praised the Ministry of Education for leading a programme that is seeing marked improvements in achievement and retention of students in schools.

Called Positive Behaviour for Learning “School-Wide” (PB4L), the initiative has helped schools and whanau address problem behaviour, strengthen relationships and improve school culture.

“As in many other issues, government departments, the community and whanau have to work closely to make real changes and effectively deliver better public services,” Mr Rennie said.

“This initiative shows that the Ministry of Education and its partners have done just that for the benefit of our school children and I recognise them for this achievement,” Mr Rennie said.

Many of the PB4L programme’s initiatives were developed by the Ministry in collaboration with the Ministry of Social Development (Child Youth and Family), the Ministry of Justice, the Ministry of Health, and the New Zealand Police.

Indicators

The 2013 PB4L Update, available from the Ministry of Education, showed that the 408 schools implementing PB4L “School-Wide”were reaping positive results. In depth analysis of 86 schools that commenced“School-Wide” in 2010 showed improvements in student retention and NCEA Level 1 achievement rates. Stand down rate have also decreased. Stand downs are used when a student’s behaviour has become difficult and time out of school is required to stabilise the situation.

The progress was also notable when comparing achievement, retention and stand down rates of schools implementing “School-Wide” with schools that were not implementing the programme.

Anecdotal feedback from parents, whanau, teachers and schools has also been overwhelmingly positive.

PB4L in action

Murray Bootten, Principal at Naenae Primary School and one of the champions of the PB4L “School-Wide” programme says, “Before our school started the programme in 2010, our main behaviour issues were aggression, fighting and intimidation of staff and students.

“We’ve gone from a situationwherechildren were looking over their shoulder to see who was going to get them next, to now where we have very few incidences of bad behaviour,” says Mr Bootten.

Julie Anderson, Principal at Queen’s High School in Dunedin said she likes PB4L because it encourages schools to find their own solutions to create more positive learning environments.

“Using the PB4L approach, we found that many referrals, where students were sent out of class for misbehaving, happened when students moved from class to interval or lunch breaks. We encouraged our students to find a solution. And they did. They put a roading system in the corridors, complete with markings. Congestion and frustration has eased and we’re now getting around more calmly,” Mrs Anderson said.

‘Ka Pai’ cards are another PB4L initiative improving relationships at Queen’s High. “The cards are used to reward positive behaviour. They go towards movie and canteen vouchers and relate to our house points system,” says Mrs Anderson.

“These approaches are really working. Referral rates dropped 75 per cent among some Year 10 students in 2013. Across the school, they dropped by 47 per cent between 2012 and 2013. PB4L has helped teachers and students feel that we are all on the same side. That has really helped the school culture,” says the Queen’s High School principal.

The 2013 PB4L Update report also presents findings from an evaluation of the effectiveness of the Incredible Years programme targeted at parents. The evaluation showed positive behaviour change was achieved for children whose parents participated in the programme. Over 9,600 parents have participated in the Incredible Years Parent programme and 6,300 teachers have been involved in the Incredible Years Teacher programme.

Collaborating, building strong relations

“We have seen that collaborating and building strong relationships with key partners in the education and community sectors help ensure that programmes reach the right communities and are more effective,” PB4L Programme Manager Virginia Burton-Konia said.

“I think PB4L’s success is due to the commitment and drive of the organisations involved around increasing educational achievement and improving children’s wellbeing,” Ms Burton-Konia said.

ENDS.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Carrie Fisher: Hollywood In-Breeding & The Velocity Of Being - Binoy Kampmark

There was always going to be a good deal of thick drama around Carrie Fisher, by her own confession, a product of Hollywood in-breeding. Her parents, Debbie Reynolds and the crooner Eddie Fisher, provided ample material for the gossip columns in a marriage breakup after Eddie sped away with Elizabeth Taylor. More>>

  • Image: Tracey Nearmy / EPA
  • Gordon Campbell: On The Best Albums Of 2016

    OK, I’m not even going to try and rationalise this surrender to a ‘best of’ listicle. Still…maybe there is an argument for making some semblance of narrative order out of a year that brought us Trump, Brexit and the deaths of Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen and Alan Vega, who I missed just as much as the Big Three. So without further ado….oh, but first a word from the sponsor More>>

    Emojis: World’s First Māori Emoji App Launched

    It’s here - the world’s first Māori emoji app Emotiki has landed just in time for summer roadtrips and santa stockings, with 200 Māori and Kiwi cultural icons for people to share their kiwiana moments with each other and the world. More>>

    Howard Davis: Album Of The Year - Van Morrison's 'Keep Me Singing'

    2016 was a grand year for Van The Man - The Belfast Cowboy turned 71, received a knighthood, and reissued an expanded set of soul-fired live recordings from 1973 ('It's Too Late to Stop Now'). In the game for 53 years now, Morrison's albums consistently open new windows into the heart and soul of one of the most enigmatic figures in modern music. More>>

    Review: The NZSO Performs Handel's Messiah

    Max Rashbrooke: Saturday night's performance took the piece back to something like the way it would have originally been performed when premiered in 1742, with an orchestra of 20-30 players and only a few more singers. More>>

    Culture: Rare Hundertwasser Conservation Posters Found After 40 Years

    When Jan and Arnold Heine put a roll of conservation posters into storage in 1974 they had no idea that 42 years later they would be collectors items. More>>

    Scoop Review Of Books: The Stolen Island: Searching for ‘Ata by Scott Hamilton

    Reviewed by Michael Horowitz
    Located even further south than temperate Noumea, Tonga’s tiny island of ‘Ata might have become the jewel of the kingdom’s burgeoning tourist industry. Imagine a Tongan resort that would not only be mild in winter, but pleasant in summer. More>>

    Scoop Review of Books: Extraordinary Anywhere: Essays On Place From Aotearoa NZ

    The New Zealand landscape undoubtedly is very beautiful, but so is the British one, and my attachment to this country is much more about some particular places, and the memories and emotions that in them combine, than it is about the landscape as a whole. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Education
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news