Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Schools’ ability to keep students safe from some staff

28 January 2014

New ERO report looks at schools’ ability to keep students safe from some staff

A new report from the Education Review Office (ERO) has found that two-thirds of schools reviewed had satisfactory practices for appointing and managing staff which were designed to keep students safe.

However, the practices of one-third of schools meant they were unlikely to recognise situations when students could be at risk from staff and respond appropriately.

The report, ‘Student Safety in Schools - Recruiting and Managing Staff’, publishes the findings of an evaluation completed in 2013. ERO undertook the evaluation at the request of the State Services Commission and the Ministry of Education following two recent inquiries into the employment of sex offenders. (The inquiries were The Ministerial Inquiry into the Employment of a Convicted Sex Offender in the Education Sector; and the Report to the Commissioner of Pamapuria School on Review of the Employment and Offences of James Parker.)

ERO’s Manager Evaluation Services, Stephanie Greaney says school boards and leaders have a key role to play in making sure students are safe.

“Our findings highlight that although all trustees and school leaders agreed that student safety is paramount, some schools need to increase their commitment to students’ safety when employing and managing staff,” says Mrs Greaney.

“In addition, education agencies need to actively support schools by making sure advice and regulation about what is required is easy for school trustees to find and understand,” she says.

“We have made recommendations for schools and education agencies in our report, and included questions which boards can use to review and improve their own employment practices.”

One-third of the schools ERO investigated had robust practices and closely followed procedures that focused on child advocacy when appointing and managing staff. The report includes examples of these practices, and information about resources boards can use when employing staff.

Information for the report was gathered from online surveys completed by principals and boards of trustees’ chairpersons, from scheduled reviews of 173 schools with primary age students, and from focused reviews of 27 schools with years 9 to 13 students.

The full report is available online.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news