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Three quarters of a million children go back to school

30 January 2014

Three quarters of a million children go back to school

More than 10,000 children are due to start school for the first time as schools open for the new year this week and next.

“Over the whole school year, an estimated 62,000 five year olds will begin their primary schooling”, says Ministry of Education head of sector enablement and support Katrina Casey.

“And right across Years 1-13, more than three quarters of a million children are expected to head back to school this week and next. Actual numbers will be confirmed in March roll returns from schools.”

“Going into the new school year, there are a number of things parents can do to support their children to achieve well at school. They include providing a quiet space for homework and making time to listen to their school-related concerns. And remember, parents are able to phone the school anytime to make an appointment to discuss their child’s progress.”

“For older students heading into NCEA, the start of the year is a great time to sit down with them and set some goals for the year ahead. Check in monthly on how progress is going.”

Estimated school rolls by region

Regional CouncilYear 1 Entire School YearYear 1 Beginning of School YearYear 1-13
Beginning of
School Year*
Northland Region2420400
Auckland Region217703630260,629
Waikato Region6250104075,001
Bay of Plenty Region423070051,468
Gisborne Region7801309,291
Hawkes Bay Region230038028,833
Taranaki Region168028019,664
Manawatu-Wanganui Region323054039,267
Wellington Region6470108078,312
Marlborough Region5801006,518
Nelson Region6001008,318
Tasman Region6501107,783
West Coast Region430704,676
Canterbury Region7120119087,332
Otago Region235039030,553
Chatham Is. County10066
Southland Region133022016,410

*Year 1-13 figures are Full Time Equivalent numbers

What can parents do to help their kids achieve well at school?
• Remember you can phone the school anytime and make an appointment to talk about your son or daughter’s progress.
• Provide a quiet space for homework and help set good homework routines.
• Keep in touch with what they are learning and what is happening at school and make time to listen to their school-related concerns.
• Attend parent-teacher meetings so you can get good information on progress
• Have questions prepared for the parent-teacher meeting.

What about older children?
• For older children, work with your son or daughter to set goals for what they would like to achieve this year. It’s important these are their goals too. If they don’t want to set meaningful goals, find out what the obstacles are.
• Plan for regular catch ups with your son or daughter so they can report back to you on their progress in achieving against their goals.
• Ask your child what support they need to achieve their goals – if they need extra help talk to their teachers, ideally with them present.
• Talk about the future with your son or daughter. Where do they want to go and how will they get there?
• Go along to NCEA information evenings


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