Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Plenty of choice in primary industry

Abby Hull had three job offers waiting for her by the time she graduated university. “The primary industry is a strong space for careers with all the new technology, compliance and requirements on farm,” she said.

“The industry requires a lot more grads now, so there are plenty of jobs out there,” she commented.

The primary sector often goes unnoticed as a viable career path for many young people, even though it is one of the most lucrative industries in the country.

Federated Farmers reports that agriculture, together with the food and forestry sectors generate 70 percent of New Zealand's merchandise export earnings. So it’s no wonder that graduates in the primary sector earn an average salary of $55,000, well above the national average of $46,000.

After finishing her Bachelor of Applied Science (now known as AgriScience) at Massey University, Abby was offered two different jobs with banks and another with Dairy NZ as a graduate consulting officer. She chose Dairy NZ, and after six months she moved up to a more senior consulting role where she is today.

In efforts to educate secondary students of the range of career possibilities within the primary industry New Zealand Young Farmers, Beef+Lamb NZ and Dairy NZ have joined forces and for the last three years have been running Get Ahead Career Experience Days.

There are ten days held around the country annually and over 1000 students attend to hear from successful industry professionals and learn about different career pathways in the primary sector. They are also able to meet with representatives from universities and training centres to ask questions and find out about scholarships available. The days showcase both the on farm and business related career opportunities – from pasture to plate, there is a career for everyone.

Based in the Manawatu/Horowhenua area Abby says her job is very busy and it’s never quite the same.

Abby, 24, works with farmers to gain an understanding of what their goals are and creates opportunities for them in order to produce positive on farm change. “It’s never a boring day!” she said.

Abby says there is more to the primary industry than just gumboots and milking cows, there are different talents and skill sets that all have a place and contribute to the success of the industry.

“There is definitely a huge demand for people in the primary sector,” she said. Dairy NZ estimates the primary industry will need at least 1250 agriculture-related graduates every year for sustainable growth.

But it’s not just a numbers game. The industry will need skilled, qualified and capable workers to sustain its future and it starts with encouraging students into the primary sector and educating the future leaders.

KPMG reported that on average just over two-thirds of rural New Zealand students are completing their secondary education, compared to the 76% national average.

Abby was impressed with the Get Ahead programme: “It’s great to see how enthusiastic and keen all these young kids are to learn about agriculture and a great opportunity for the ones who perhaps haven’t seen the career pathways in the agriculture sector.”

The Get Ahead Career Experience Days begin in Gore, 3 March and continue around the country:

Oamaru: 5 March
Christchurch: 13 March
Rai Valley: 18 March
Wellington: 20 March
Palmerston North: 25 March
Hawera: 27 March
Gisborne: 1 April
Cambridge: 3 April
Whangarei: 9 April

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news