Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Parents sought for online Triple P Parenting trial

Parents of three and four year-old children who exhibit inattentive and overactive behaviour are sought for a study of the Triple P Positive Parenting Programme.

The Parenting Research Group at the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Education is seeking 30 parents from throughout New Zealand to complete an online version of the programme.

Parents already taking part in the study have reported a decline in inattentive, hyperactive behaviour and that their child is happier and easier to discipline and there is more quality time with the family.

One parent says she wished she had done the course sooner: “I just thought I had one of those kids that you see in the supermarket with their parents not controlling them.”

The online programme involves eight half-hour modules and personalised phone support. The programme is free and parents can complete it in their own time and at their one pace at home.

Research soon to be published in the Journal of Primary Prevention studying 193 families has found that both mothers and fathers of the 97 families who took part in the Triple P online programme reported the same levels of improved behaviour in their children as the families who did the course using the Triple P workbook.

Matt Sanders, Adjunct Professor in the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Education, and Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Queensland, says the first step parents should take is to recognise that taking the Triple P programme is a sign of success and not about admitting failure as a parent.

He explains that parents are encouraged to see involvement in the Triple P Programme research as an empowering step towards developing more positive relationships with their child and increased confidence in their skills as a parent.

“This is an evaluation trial to rigorously test the success of an online model of Triple P specifically with parents of pre-schoolers exhibiting inattentive and overactive behaviour,” says Matt.

“While there is a wide range of clinician and group services available for parents, there can be an associated stigma which can be a barrier to parents’ participation in a parenting programme. An internet-based model for concerned parents will enable them to see what they can do on their own before seeking face-to-face professional support.”

“More and more people are going to be seeking high quality solutions to parenting problems on-line. The programme is not about becoming dependent on internet-based wisdom. It aims to help parents become independent problem-solvers by using the programme as a tool rather than the end game.”

The Triple P online programme has the benefit of being trialled and tested, and is backed by strong scientific evidence – something a lot of internet-based information and support does not offer.

The choice of targeting the programme at the three and four- year age group was made due to the importance of intervention with behavioural problems at an early age, thus preventing further related issues arising later in childhood.

“It is easier to turn behavioural difficulties around at an early age,” says Louise Keown, Principal Investigator. Once children start school these can be compounded by difficulties with peers and teacher relationships. If these behaviours can be managed earlier rather than later, positive outcomes for children are more likely to occur.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Sheep: Shearing Record Smashed In Hawke’s Bay

Three shearers gathered from around New Zealand have smashed a World record by 264 sheep despite the heat, the pumiced sheep of inland Hawke’s Bay and a year’s wool weighing an average of over 3.5kg a sheep. More>>

ALSO:

Carrie Fisher: Hollywood In-Breeding & The Velocity Of Being - Binoy Kampmark

There was always going to be a good deal of thick drama around Carrie Fisher, by her own confession, a product of Hollywood in-breeding. Her parents, Debbie Reynolds and the crooner Eddie Fisher, provided ample material for the gossip columns in a marriage breakup after Eddie sped away with Elizabeth Taylor. More>>

  • Image: Tracey Nearmy / EPA
  • Gordon Campbell: On The Best Albums Of 2016

    OK, I’m not even going to try and rationalise this surrender to a ‘best of’ listicle. Still…maybe there is an argument for making some semblance of narrative order out of a year that brought us Trump, Brexit and the deaths of Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen and Alan Vega, who I missed just as much as the Big Three. So without further ado….oh, but first a word from the sponsor More>>

    Emojis: World’s First Māori Emoji App Launched

    It’s here - the world’s first Māori emoji app Emotiki has landed just in time for summer roadtrips and santa stockings, with 200 Māori and Kiwi cultural icons for people to share their kiwiana moments with each other and the world. More>>

    ALSO:

    Howard Davis: Album Of The Year - Van Morrison's 'Keep Me Singing'

    2016 was a grand year for Van The Man - The Belfast Cowboy turned 71, received a knighthood, and reissued an expanded set of soul-fired live recordings from 1973 ('It's Too Late to Stop Now'). In the game for 53 years now, Morrison's albums consistently open new windows into the heart and soul of one of the most enigmatic figures in modern music. More>>

    Review: The NZSO Performs Handel's Messiah

    Max Rashbrooke: Saturday night's performance took the piece back to something like the way it would have originally been performed when premiered in 1742, with an orchestra of 20-30 players and only a few more singers. More>>

    Culture: Rare Hundertwasser Conservation Posters Found After 40 Years

    When Jan and Arnold Heine put a roll of conservation posters into storage in 1974 they had no idea that 42 years later they would be collectors items. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Education
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news