Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Professor inducted into the Reading Hall of Fame

Professor’s work honoured with induction into the Reading Hall of Fame

Professor Stuart McNaughton of the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Education is to be inducted into the International Reading Association’s Reading Hall of Fame, making him just the third New Zealander currently in the prestigious institution.

The Hall of Fame was established by the United States based International Reading Association in 1973 in order to use the collective research experiences of its members to improve the teaching of reading.

It currently has 128 members from around the world and new members are nominated by existing members each year.

Professor McNaughton will be inducted at the International Reading Association Annual Conference to be held in New Orleans in May. He found out about the honour when he received a letter from the organisation earlier this month.

“I am delighted to have received this nomination. I understand it is the result of my research and teaching in this field,” Professor McNaughton says.

“It is an honour to be involved in this work and I want to thank my colleagues for their support over the years and the many teachers, children and families that have inspired me as I have worked alongside them.”

Professor McNaughton is currently Director of the Faculty’s Woolf Fisher Research Centre. He is a long standing member of a number of international scientific organisations in child development, educational research and literacy.

For the past three years he has worked with more than 15 schools instigating the Woolf Fisher Lead Teacher Masters Scholarships that are focused on improving achievement in their schools through leadershipproblem solving.

He has recently co-developed a post-graduate programme with the Manaiakalani schools in Tamaki to support the digital learning, community-based programmes they have developed across their cluster.

In order to meet the criteria for induction, members must have had a minimum of 25-years of active involvement in work in reading; a reputation that is widely respected by people in the profession; and must have authored papers on reading, including reports of significant research.

Inductees must have shown performance in positions of responsibility in the field of reading; and participation in professional activities such as speaking, organising programmes, and consulting or assisting teachers in other ways.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Werewolf: Music Criticism As A Dating Metaphor

Music criticism can be just another form of consumer advic... Yet ever since pop music criticism first entered the media mainstream it has played a wider role, too. Rather than a decree with a numerical score attached, this kind of criticism functions more like travel notes. A conversation, even a form of seduction. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news