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Waiariki Institute of Technology - Biological Farming

13 February 2014

Waiariki Institute of Technology supports the Biological Farming Conference through Open Day

The second national conference on biological farming systems has been gaining popularity with farmers, researchers and biological companies. Now, thanks to Waiariki Institute of Technology, the general public will have an opportunity to learn about and experience a bit of biological farming systems.

Waiariki is assisting with the organisation of the Biological Farming and Sustainability Open Day taking place on Saturday, 22 February 2014, at their Mokoia Campus from 10.00 am to 2.00 pm.

Entry to the Open Day is free and the general public are encouraged to attend.

“Our aim for the Open Day is to promote biological farming concepts to the general public and also to connect the public with the biological farming community and sustainability groups,” Prof. Guna Magesan, conference coordinator.

A number of biological fertiliser companies, sustainability groups, research and educational institutes will be exhibiting and sharing their knowledge.

Public organisations such as Scion, Waiariki, Te Puni Kokiri and Bay of Plenty Regional Council will be promoting their work.

Dr Michael Quintern of Noke Ltd, a well-known scientist in the area of waste management and sustainability, will explain the concepts of vermicomposting. He will set up worm farms and put some worm capsules into dishes to demonstrate hatching baby worms.

Denise La Grouw, promoter of Rotorua Sustainable Backyards, will share her share passion with the community about our future.

Andre Prassinos from Biobrew, a recent award winner, will be displaying their work.

Similarly, other companies such as NZ Nature Farming, Homeopathic Farm Support, and Farmlands will be setting up stalls to promote sustainability and biological farming.

The Open Day will be held after two days of technical sessions of oral and poster presentations. The conference will be inaugurated by Her Worship the Mayor of Rotorua Ms Steve Chadwick.

More than 150 farmers, Māori land owners, soil and environmental scientists, consultants, ecologists, land management specialists, and representatives from government agencies, universities, crown research institutes, regional councils, fertiliser companies, agricultural and horticultural businesses are participating in the conference.

The theme of the conference is “Biological farming under different land uses”, reflecting the vital role of biological farming in sustaining our economy, our environment, and our communities.


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