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Massey University Students To Lose Their Magazine

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Massey University Students To Lose Their Magazine

To whom it may concern

On behalf of Albany Students’ Association (ASA), Massey University Students’ Association (MUSA), Massey Wellington Students’ Association (MAWSA) and the Massey University Extramural Students’ Society (EXMSS) we regretfully announce Massey University will be the first university in the country post-VSM to no longer have a printed student magazine.

The February 26 issue of MASSIVE magazine will be the final edition in print capacity. From this date onwards, MASSIVE will exist as MASSIVE media, and will be primarily online. 

This change may come as a surprise to many. It has arisen due to the limited funding via the student services levy made available to MAWSA (the primary owner of MASSIVE). These funds are distributed by Massey University’s External Relations department.

MAWSA is no longer able to provide MASSIVE in the way that it has in the past two years. We have many stakeholders - most notably students - who are affected by this change and we appreciate your understanding as we begin this transition.

This year marks the 80th anniversary of Massey student magazines.

As the only national student magazine in New Zealand, MASSIVE has catered for campuses in Albany, Manawatu and Wellington, as well as a large community of extramural students. This follows a long history of student magazines in Massey, including former single campus magazines Satellite (Albany), Magneto (Wellington), Off-Campus (Extramural) and Chaff (Manawatu), which was founded in 1934. With the university’s support and the agreement of the Massey students’ associations, these magazines dissolved and MASSIVE was launched early 2012 in the post-VSM environment.

We are looking for positives through this transition, and hope to continue to deliver leading New Zealand student media through other outlets.  We also hope that this situation will lead to greater collaboration and stronger relationships between Massey’s students’ associations, with MASSIVE, in whatever form it may take, as a shared operation and the voice for Massey students around the country, and the world.

In the spirit of acknowledging our treaty-based partnerships with each Roopu on campus, each student’s association has been actively seeking and will continue to engage with Manawatahi, Kokiri Ngatahi and Te Waka O Nga Akonga Maori, to ensure independent and diverse student voices continue to exist at Massey.

ENDS

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