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Bayer signs up to further support of science in schools

Bayer signs up to further support of science in schools

Auckland, 12 March 2014 - Bayer New Zealand is continuing its support of science education in primary schools with the renewing of a three year commitment to the Bayer Primary School Science Fund.

Administered by the Royal Society of New Zealand, the fund is worth $120,000 over three years and is designed to give primary schools the opportunity to apply for funding to support environmental science education and resource Nature of Science activities.

Bayer New Zealand Managing Director Dr Holger Detje says Bayer initially set up the fund three years ago following a recommendation from the Royal Society.

“As a science-based company we have had a close relationship with the Royal Society of New Zealand for several years. We wanted to contribute to science education in New Zealand, so naturally sought their advice on how we could best assist.

“The Royal Society’s response was very clear – primary schools in New Zealand are only allocated a minimal budget for teaching science, which in turn limits the sorts of hands-on activities students can participate in.

“The result was the establishment of the Bayer Primary School Science Fund, which has proven to be a tremendous success allowing dozens of schools throughout New Zealand to run science and environmental projects they otherwise would have struggled to deliver.”

Dr Detje says Bayer New Zealand is delighted to have made a difference and subsequently continue with the fund for another three years.

Royal Society of New Zealand CEO Dr Di McCarthy says the Royal Society of New Zealand is committed to advancing quality primary science education by encouraging primary students and their teachers to understand, participate and contribute to authentic science activities.

“We are delighted to once again work with Bayer New Zealand and that the Bayer Primary School Science Fund is continuing for another three years.

“This fund supports quality environmental science education teaching and learning programmes. Such programmes have strong links to the Nature of Science strand of the New Zealand curriculum and which involve practical, hands-on science investigations whilst working alongside and engaging with school, local and science communities.”

The aim of the Bayer Primary School Fund is to give primary schools some financial support to enhance an existing, or kick-start a new, environmental science education and Nature of Science teaching and learning programme.

Types of projects supported in the past include:

• Setting up of a school garden with native plants that encourage native birds and butterflies
• Riparian planting
• School planting of trees to provide shelter and shade
• Science equipment for environmental science education teaching and learning and investigation, eg, stream monitoring
• Science equipment to support the Nature of Science strand of the New Zealand Science curriculum, including identifying, exploring, testing and modelling
• Compositing and soil conditioning, eg, worm farms
• Recycling projects
• Water clarity
• Water health effects on aquaculture.

For further information about the fund visit:

Applications for Round 1 of funding close April 2.

For further information about Bayer’s community support program in New Zealand, visit


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