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Students Invited to Apply For 2014 Rose Hellaby Scholarships

Guardian Trust and the Maori Education Trust Invite Students to Apply For 2014 Rose Hellaby Scholarships

Legacy continues to inspire future Māori leaders

Guardian Trust and the Māori Education Trust are again calling for eligible Māori students to submit their applications for a valuable boost to their education prospects. For the annual distribution of approximately $130,000 to more than 112 Māori students, the two organisations are seeking applications for the 2014 round from the Rose Hellaby Māori Education Fund.

Applications for the 2014 postgraduate scholarships close on 28 March 2014. The postgraduate scholarships specifically support outstanding Māori students undertaking Masters, PhD or other postgraduate study in the fields of engineering, mathematics, science, technology or medicine, but with a particular bias toward those eager to provide leadership to Māori in their given field and benefit Māori generally. There are two postgraduate awards available, worth up to $30,000 each.

Also eligible for scholarships from the fund are Māori undergraduates (applications also close 28 March 2014) studying in the scientific, mathematical or technical fields. There are 30 $1,000 undergraduate awards available whilst a further 80 secondary school scholarships are granted to Year 9 students.

Established in 1969, Guardian Trust (sole trustee, administrator and investment manager) has distributed $3.392 million from the Rose Hellaby Māori Education Fund, via the Māori Education Trust, to nearly 5,000 Māori students, including $1.1million in the past decade.

Identifying the opportunity to further support Māori into higher education, Guardian Trust and the Māori Education Trust formally created the Rose Hellaby Postgraduate Māori Scholarships in 2010. The late Rose Hellaby was a visionary, explorer, philanthropist and descendant of the Auckland-based meat dynasty, and established her eponymous Māori Education Fund with the goal of creating educational opportunity for Māori children and young adults.

Philip Morgan Rees, Guardian Trust’s General Manager Personal Client Services, says, "The Rose Hellaby Māori Education Fund is a prime example of the generosity of New Zealanders, and the ability to create an enduring legacy that will continue to support future generations in perpetuity. Guardian Trust, as keeper and protector of Rose’s great legacy, is privileged to be able to bestow her wishes by enabling tomorrow’s leaders to grow and prosper. We look forward to celebrating this year’s deserving recipients at our annual Rose Hellaby Awards ceremony.

“We hope Rose would be pleased by the ongoing fulfilment of her goals for Māori education and the enrichment of young academics.”

Evelyn Newman, Manager of the Māori Education Trust, says, “This is always an exciting time of year for us as we start receiving scholarship applications from the next round of future Māori leaders in their respective fields. We are truly inspired by Rose Hellaby’s work and I have visited Rose Hellaby House in Waitakere to immerse myself in her legacy. The scholarships offered by this fund touch many lives, from high school students to postgraduate students, their families and their communities.

“We’re privileged to work alongside the team at Guardian Trust, who possess a passion for and focus on directing these scholarships to people with leadership ability and who provide support to others in their field and communities.”

The Māori Education Trust manages 16 scholarships, which offer approximately 290 individual awards. The Rose Hellaby Postgraduate Māori Scholarship is the largest scholarship paid to any one recipient.

More information and application forms can be found at www.maorieducation.org.nz via the Apply for Scholarships page.

About Guardian Trust
Established in 1882, Guardian Trust (the New Zealand Guardian Trust Company Limited) is the leading corporate trustee in New Zealand.

Through its network of offices across New Zealand, Guardian Trust manages or administers over $2.6 billion of clients’ assets and provides corporate trustee services for securities with over $82 billion under supervision.

Guardian Trust has been serving generations of New Zealanders for nearly 130 years and is a market leader in charitable trusts. As one of New Zealand’s foremost trustee companies, it specialises in estate planning and asset protection for retirees; managing the financial affairs of retirees who no longer wish to or are unable to do so themselves and investment management in retirement.

About Guardian Trust & Philanthropy
As the country’s pre-eminent provider of philanthropic services, Guardian Trust offers strategic advice, long-term investment management, careful planning and a commitment to ensuring that people’s generosity is effectively sustained over many lifetimes.

The charitable distributions from trusts established by Guardian Trust and its clients touch all facets of life – from the very young through the Starship Foundation to the sick and elderly through Hospices of New Zealand. Some trusts support research into illness, through organisations like the Cancer Society and the National Heart Foundation, and others provide social support, through organisations such as the Salvation Army and Presbyterian Support. During 2011 around 11% of all estimated donations from charitable trusts in New Zealand were distributed by Guardian Trust. Guardian Trust has distributed more than $175 million in the past 20 years to numerous charitable organisations.

Guardian Trust encourages people to review estate planning and trusts regularly to ensure they meet their wishes in current times and will have longevity. Those with wills should seek advice on whether they are able to establish a charitable trust to ensure a favoured cause is supported for generations to come: $500,000 is the advisable minimum to establish a charitable trust.

ENDS

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