Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Northland whānau get help to make sense of their dollars

Thursday, March 20, 2014
Northland whānau get help to make sense of their dollars

Eighteen Ngāpuhi community workers who have completed a pilot financial literacy training programme will be recognised at a special graduation ceremony in Paihia on Friday.

Funded by the Māori Women’s Development Inc, the specially-designed programme was arranged by the Fin-Ed Centre (Financial Education and Research Centre), a joint venture between Massey University and Westpac.

The group of community workers, including those from Whānau Ora, now have the skills to teach whānau in their community how to improve their financial wellbeing through budgeting, debt management and tracking their spending.

Fin-Ed Centre director Dr Pushpa Wood, who also facilitated the training programme, says the response to the course has been extremely positive.

“This has been one of the most rewarding teaching experiences of my career – the feedback has been truly positive and the reflective journals that were sumbitted at the end of the course show some real life-changing shifts in attitudes and actions,” she says.

“One of my favourite notes came from a community worker who said spending diaries had been a real eye-opener for the whānau she worked with. More importantly, she said the small changes they made after seeing what was being wasted are still in place today.”

Māori Women’s Development Inc chief executive Teresa Tepania-Ashton says, as a last resort micro-finance entity, her organisation understands the importance of developing basic financial literacy skills.

“Financial literacy empowers whānau to make good financial decisions, this programme is about equipping them with the skills that can change their lives.”

Te Rūnanga-Ā-Iwi-O-Ngāphui general manager Allen Wihongi, whose organisation is the lead agency within Te Pu O Te Wheke Whanau Ora Collective, says the pilot programme addressed an area of need within the community.

“One of the key strategies both our local organisations have is to build capacity within our whānau, hapū, marae and iwi. Part of that is building their knowledge base around financial literacy to help them keep good books and to understand what is going on in the domestic and global economy around them and how it impacts on them at home.”

The training course was based on the Fin-Ed Centre’s Certificate in Facilitating Personal Financial Management, which is designed for people who want to improve their skills in delivering financial literacy to others, but who do not want to undertake a full degree or diploma porgramme.

Dr Wood says both the content and delivery model were customised to include more face-to-face teaching time and to recognise the special cultural needs of the Ngāpuhi community. Each community worker was required to work with three whānau as part of the programme, and each will now take their knowledge out into the community by working with others.

It is hoped the financial literacy programme will be rolled out in other communities around the country and the Fin-Ed Centre and the Māori Women’s Development Inc are already in discussions with a number of organisations.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Māori Language Week: He Karanga Kia Kaha Ake Te Tīhau Ki Te Reo Māori

The Māori Language Commission wishes to see social media swamped with Māori language tweets and messages for Te Wiki o te Reo Māori using the hashtag #tekupu. More>>

ALSO:

Book Vote: Kiwis Prefer Young Adult & Classics

To compile their Top 100 List for 2014, Whitcoulls again asked New Zealanders to vote for their favourite books and authors. And while classic novels continue to appeal to Kiwi readers, 2014 marks a significant new trend – the increasing popularity of novels for young adults. More>>

ALSO:

Five NZ Cities: Bill Bailey Back To The Southern Hemisphere

The gap between how we imagine our lives to be and how they really are is the subject of Bill’s new show Limboland. With his trademark intelligence and sharp wit, he tells tales of finding himself in this halfway place. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Book Television Is Coming

Carole Beu of The Women’s Bookshop in Auckland, Graham Beattie of The Book Blog and producer Deb Faith of FaceTV have raised enough money via crowd funding at Boosted – just under $7,000 so far – for 12 episodes, which begin production in September, and will be on screen later that month. More>>

Electric Sheep: Light Nelson Exceeds All Expectations

Light Nelson exceeded all expectations drawing over 40,000 people over two nights to the Queens Gardens and surrounds. The event, with over 40 installations from local and national artists, is in its second year, and organisers were hoping they’d top last year’s crowd of 16,000. More>>

MacGyver: Richard Dean Anderson To Attend Armageddon This October

New Zealand’s biggest pulp-culture event, the Armageddon Expo is proud to announce the world’s most recognised DIY action hero will be attending the Auckland event at the ASB Showgrounds from October 24th to 27th. More>>

ALSO:

Barbershop Gold: Māori Party Singing Praises Of The Musical Island Boys

The Maori Party has congratulated four young men on a mission, who in 2002 took up barbershop singing at Tawa College, and tonight took out the Gold Medal in the 2014 International Barbershop Harmony Society competitions in Las Vegas. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news