Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Regaining trust key to restorative justice

21 March 2014

Regaining trust key to restorative justice

An inaugural professorial lecture by Victoria University of Wellington’s new Chair in Restorative Justice will argue that the need to restore trust is at the core of restorative justice.

Professor Chris Marshall, who is internationally acclaimed for his pioneering work in the restorative justice arena, and a qualified restorative justice facilitator and trainer, took up the position at the beginning of the year. He says that restorative justice provides the mechanisms to enable a victim to be able to regain trust in a person who has done them wrong—something the mainstream criminal justice system doesn’t always do.

“Rebuilding trust requires such things as honest explanation, apology, accountability to others,making good the damage done in some way—the sorts of things you would do in any relationship.”

Professor Marshall says international research on the restorative justice approach often shows a reduction in reoffending rates.

“However, its greatest success lies in the high satisfaction rates of victims who participate in it. The healing for victims this approach can deliver is hugely significant.”

Professor Marshall says that while restorative justice has its roots in the youth jurisdiction, use of restorative justice “conferencing” is now well established throughout New Zealand’s criminal justice system and is increasingly employed elsewhere as well, including in schools, workplaces, the military, social work and human rights work.

“This expansion of application is great, but it creates real problems for how we define the field. Some advocates emphasise the 'justice' part of the label, while others emphasise the ‘restorative’part.”

Restorative justice has received increased funding in recent budget rounds, signalling increasing government interest in the approach.

“It still remains somewhat on the margins though. A major challenge for theorists is to explain how what takes place in a private encounter between the victim and the offender relates to the interests of the larger justice system.”

The Chair in Restorative Justice, based in Victoria's School of Government, provides a focus for collaborative research and teaching on restorative justice theories, policies and practices. Objectives include undertaking interdisciplinary research, contributing to public policy discussions, forging national and international collaborations, offering professional development opportunities for practitioners and professionals, and providing teaching and postgraduate supervision in restorative justice theory and practice at the University.

Initial funding for the Chair in Restorative Justice has come from a private family trust, Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Social Development, Ministry of Education, Department of Corrections, the New Zealand Police and the New Zealand Defence Force, through the Victoria University Foundation.

Inaugural lecture: Restoring What? The practice, promise, and perils of restorative justice in New Zealand
Date: 25 March, 6.30–8pm
Venue: Lecture Theatre 1, Ground Floor, Rutherford House, Pipitea Campus, Bunny St
RSVP: rsvp@vuw.ac.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news