Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Painting to commemorate Antarctic soil research

7 April, 2014

Painting to commemorate Antarctic soil research

A painting depicting the first-ever Antarctic expedition dedicated to exploring Antarctic soils was gifted to the University of Waikato last month at an event held to celebrate 44 years of Earth sciences research and to commemorate the University’s 50th anniversary.

The painting features soil scientists Dr Graeme Claridge and Professor Emeritus John McCraw. Prof McCraw went on to become the founding professor and head of the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Waikato in 1970.

Artist, Hansen Ihle, was a part-time Earth sciences student at the Waikato University from 2003-2014. Encouraged by Dr Megan Balks, a lecturer in the department, Hansen worked with Prof McCraw to bring the painting to life from a copy of a black and white photo taken during the expedition.

“I worked with John to determine the colours for the painting. Luckily he had colour slides of related scenes and even still had some of the items such as the mountain-mule pack, boots, and down-filled jacket, which he was wearing when the photo was taken,” says Hansen.

In the painting the two scientists are pictured standing outside a makeshift shelter at New Harbour, Taylor Valley, Antarctica, in the summer of 1959/1960. Undertaken under the auspices of DSIR Soil Bureau, soils were mapped and sampled in Taylor Valley and investigated at a number of sites on the Ross Sea coast.

Hansen says that the wooden shelter featured in the painting was a crate in which equipment was transported to Antarctica. “Dr Claridge and Prof McCraw then converted the crate into a shelter, which was mounted on a sledge for transport and towed across the Ross Ice Shelf from Scott Base to New Harbour using Massey Fergusson tractors.”

Current Chair of Earth Sciences at Waikato University, Professor David Lowe, says there is a strong connection between this pioneering expedition and ongoing Earth sciences research at the university.

“Many Waikato academic staff, including myself, have subsequently travelled to Antarctica to undertake research, with support and encouragement from Prof McCraw. The McCraw Glacier in the Britannia Range of Antarctica was named after him in recognition of that support. Dr Balks also spent three field seasons working in Antarctica with Dr Claridge and her collaboration in publishing Antarctic research with him has spanned more than 20 years,” says Prof Lowe.


Click for big version.

Artist Hansen Ihle (left) and University of Waikato Earth scientist Professor David Lowe with the painting depicting the first-ever Antarctic expedition dedicated to exploring Antarctic soils, which was gifted to the University of Waikato last month.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Werewolf: Music Criticism As A Dating Metaphor

Music criticism can be just another form of consumer advic... Yet ever since pop music criticism first entered the media mainstream it has played a wider role, too. Rather than a decree with a numerical score attached, this kind of criticism functions more like travel notes. A conversation, even a form of seduction. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news